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Association of Assyrian Women - Shamiram - journal

by Helen Sakho — Association of Assyrian Women, Co-Editor of Shamiram journal.

Posted: Wednesday, July 22, 2015 at 06:07 AM UT | Updated: October 02, 2015


Association of Assyrian Women - Shamiram - journal

Shamiram Journal

Dear readers and friends,

Please find attached the latest issue of Shamiram – the journal of the Association of Assyrian Women, produced quarterly in I.R. Iran, by our association - an independent NGO concerned with writing about Assyrian heritage as well as current affairs. Our humble journal covers history, language, ancient and modern socio-economic and religious affairs as well as ancient Mesopotamian languages rituals and myths. A particular focus of the journal is the richness of our culture, language, embedded, transparent and enduring in Christianity and before, for example Akadian and Sumerian, but we also utilise examples of our ancestors to make inter-connections with modern ailments with our own alternative natural healing recipes , etc. Similarly, as working women/mothers we necessarily focus on issues to do with child development, violence against women and children, and peace and harmony in the family, and ultimately in society.

Similarly, as working women/mothers we necessarily focus on issues to do with child development, violence against women and children, and peace and harmony in the family, and ultimately in society.

Some of you (especially some members of the younger generation of Ealing-based Assyrians, whom I met for the first time in all the meetings and protests we organised against the Islamic Sate terror against our people (and others in the MENA region) may be receiving our journal for the first time, so just for your information we cover (in two languages so far: Assyrian and Farsi but hopefully increasingly in English also, as well as the so called “global” dialects) a whole host of areas of both specialist and non-specialist themes. My own role in the journal has been interviewing specialists, for example, Professor Geoffery Khan of Cambridge University, our beloved artist Sami Yagoub and Mardean Issac (my son when he was at Oxford reading Syriac studies, which was very kindly voluntarily translated by Dr. Madeleine Davies from English into Assyrian and printed) and Madeleine herself for her remarkable role as an educator of our precious language.

My other main role and writings in the journal deal with true migration stories under the theme of “Azoukh Bakhoukh, Lazoukh Bakhoukh” (We cry if we go, We cry if we stay) as an Economist but also as a specialist in Globalisation and Migration, covering different types of migration and the complex multiplicity of consequences for both home and host countries. I have historically utilised in my teachings worldwide, including in the UK, the same themes in different languages, with our language, Assyrian, being the constant one. See, for example, the first true story of this theme under (Helen Sakho/migration stories) which is a true narrative of a class I taught in Marrakech two years ago, on Globalisation, Power and Language in English, and the second one (in Farsi) from Shamiram (originally published in the journal in 2013 – pp54-68).

With apologies for this unusually long introduction, I wish to finally add that I will be posting a poem “Tkhomneta”, dedicated to my tribe, Tkhomnaye, who are 100 years on leaving Hakkayari and Hassaka for refuge from terror. They are distraught, homeless, hungry, and without news of those who may have died staying, running or on their way to somewhere, and crucially, not knowing if and when they can go back again, just like I saw my grandfather’s generation struggle, before they were given official permission to stay in Iran permanently all those years ago.



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