Assyrian Forums
 Home  |  Ads  |  Partners  |  Sponsors  |  Contact  |  FAQs  |  About  
 
   Holocaust  |  History  |  Library  |  People  |  TV-Radio  |  Forums  |  Community  |  Directory
  
   General  |  Activism  |  Arts  |  Education  |  Family  |  Financial  |  Government  |  Health  |  History  |  News  |  Religion  |  Science  |  Sports
   Greetings · Shläma · Bärev Dzez · Säludos · Grüße · Shälom · Χαιρετισμοί · Приветствия · 问候 · Bonjour · 挨拶 · تبریکات  · Selamlar · अभिवादन · Groete · التّحيّات

The Tower of Babel

    Previous Topic Next Topic
Home Forums Education Topic #135
Help Print Share

Fred Aprimmoderator

View member rating
 
Send email to Fred AprimSend private message to Fred AprimView profile of Fred AprimAdd Fred Aprim to your contact list
 
Member: Nov-10-1999
Posts: 150
1 feedbacks

The Tower of Babel

Jun-03-2001 at 12:31 PM (UTC+3 Nineveh, Assyria)

Many attempts have been made to attach the legend of the confusion of tongues to certain ruined towers of Babylonia, especially to that of E-Sagila, the great temple of Merodach, and some remarks upon this most interesting tale may not be out of place at this point. The myth is not found in Babylonia itself, and in its best form may be discovered in Scripture. In the Bible story we are told that every region was of one tongue and mode of speech. As men journeyed westward from their original home in the East, they encountered a plain in the land of Shinar where they settled. In this region they commenced building operations, constructed a city, and laid the foundations of a tower, the summit of which they hoped would reach to heaven itself. It would appear that this edifice was constructed with the object of serving as a great landmark to the people so that they should not be scattered over the face of the earth, and the Lord came down to view the city and the tower, and he considered that as they were all of one language this gave them undue power, and that what they imagined to themselves under such conditions they would be able achieve. So the Lord scattered them abroad from thence over the face of every region, and the building of the tower ceased and the name of it was called Babel, because at that place the single language of the people was confounded.

Of course it is merely the native name of Babylon, which translated means gate of the god, and has no such etymology as the scriptures pretend,--the Hebrews confusing their verb balal, to confuse or confound with the word babel. The story was no doubt suggested by one of the temple towers of Babylon. Over and over again we find in connexion with the Jewish religion that anything which savors of presumption or unnatural aspiration is strongly condemned. The ambitious effort of the Tower of Babel would thus seem abhorrent to the Hebrews of old. The strange things is that these ancient towers or zikkurats, as the Babylonians called them, were intended to serve as a link between heaven and earth, just as does theminaret of the Mohammedan mosque.

The legend of the confusion of tongues is to be traced in other folk-lores than that of Babylon. It is found in Central America, where the story runs that Xelhua, one of the seven giants rescued from the deluge, built the great pyramid of Cholula in order to besiege heaven. The structure was, however, destroyed by the gods, who cast down fire upon it and confounded the language of its builders. Livingstone found some such myth among the African tribes around Lake Ngami, and certain Australian and Mongolian peoples possess a similar tradition.

"Myths and Legends: Babylonia and Assyria"
by Lewis Spence

Alert   IP Print   Edit        Reply      Re-Quote Top

 
Forums Topics  Previous Topic Next Topic
vabra
 
Send email to vabraSend private message to vabraAdd vabra to your contact list
 
Member:
Member Feedback

1. tower of babel

Jun-04-2001 at 02:22 AM (UTC+3 Nineveh, Assyria)

In reply to message #0
 
Dear Fred,
What you fail to mention in the story of the tower, is that Nimrod had it built because he wanted to fight with The God Almighty. If you want to quote from the Bible, do yourself a favour and quote the whole story or non at all.

Alert   IP Print   Edit        Reply      Re-Quote Top
Fred
 
Send email to FredSend private message to FredAdd Fred to your contact list
 
Member:
Member Feedback

2. RE: tower of babel

Jun-07-2001 at 01:49 PM (UTC+3 Nineveh, Assyria)

In reply to message #1
 
Your response does not apply here really, since, as you see, I did not take portions from the Bible and left other portions out. I am not the one analyzing contents in the Bible and what it said about the tower of Babel. The passage is what Lewis Spence wrote in "Myths and Legends: Babylonia and Assyria".
If you disagree with what Lewis Spence wrote, please present your thoughts.
Fred


Alert   IP Print   Edit        Reply      Re-Quote Top

Forums Topics  Previous Topic Next Topic


Assyria \ã-'sir-é-ä\ n (1998)   1:  an ancient empire of Ashur   2:  a democratic state in Bet-Nahren, Assyria (northern Iraq, northwestern Iran, southeastern Turkey and eastern Syria.)   3:  a democratic state that fosters the social and political rights to all of its inhabitants irrespective of their religion, race, or gender   4:  a democratic state that believes in the freedom of religion, conscience, language, education and culture in faithfulness to the principles of the United Nations Charter — Atour synonym

Ethnicity, Religion, Language
» Israeli, Jewish, Hebrew
» Assyrian, Christian, Aramaic
» Saudi Arabian, Muslim, Arabic
Assyrian \ã-'sir-é-an\ adj or n (1998)   1:  descendants of the ancient empire of Ashur   2:  the Assyrians, although representing but one single nation as the direct heirs of the ancient Assyrian Empire, are now doctrinally divided, inter sese, into five principle ecclesiastically designated religious sects with their corresponding hierarchies and distinct church governments, namely, Church of the East, Chaldean, Maronite, Syriac Orthodox and Syriac Catholic.  These formal divisions had their origin in the 5th century of the Christian Era.  No one can coherently understand the Assyrians as a whole until he can distinguish that which is religion or church from that which is nation -- a matter which is particularly difficult for the people from the western world to understand; for in the East, by force of circumstances beyond their control, religion has been made, from time immemorial, virtually into a criterion of nationality.   3:  the Assyrians have been referred to as Aramaean, Aramaye, Ashuraya, Ashureen, Ashuri, Ashuroyo, Assyrio-Chaldean, Aturaya, Chaldean, Chaldo, ChaldoAssyrian, ChaldoAssyrio, Jacobite, Kaldany, Kaldu, Kasdu, Malabar, Maronite, Maronaya, Nestorian, Nestornaye, Oromoye, Suraya, Syriac, Syrian, Syriani, Suryoye, Suryoyo and Telkeffee. — Assyrianism verb

Aramaic \ar-é-'máik\ n (1998)   1:  a Semitic language which became the lingua franca of the Middle East during the ancient Assyrian empire.   2:  has been referred to as Neo-Aramaic, Neo-Syriac, Classical Syriac, Syriac, Suryoyo, Swadaya and Turoyo.

Please consider the environment when disposing of this material — read, reuse, recycle. ♻
AIM | Atour: The State of Assyria | Terms of Service