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Assyrians post-Nineveh

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Assyrians post-Nineveh

Dec-26-2012 at 09:34 PM (UTC+3 Nineveh, Assyria)

Assyrians post-Nineveh
identity, fragmentation, conflict, and survival
(672 BC - 1920)
A study of Assyrogenous communities
by Dr. Racho Donef

Purchase Information: Amazon

Assyrians post-Nineveh
identity, fragmentation, conflict, and survival (672 BC - 1920)
A study of Assyrogenous communities
by Dr. Racho Donef — Sydney, Australia. December, 2012.

Book Information

Paperback: 200 pages
Publisher: Racho Donef (December 16, 2012)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 0987423908
ISBN-13: 978-0987423900
Book Dimensions:
9 x 6 x 0.5 inches
Shipping Weight: 12.8 ounces

Preface

Many terms have been employed to define the population group referred to as Assyrians: Syrians, Jacobites, Nestorians and Chaldeans are the most common, but arguably also Maronites, Melkites and Arameans. This varied usage reflects the want of linguistic, cultural, religious and ethnic homogeneity among the Assyrians. Although, the Assyrian identity covers all the above-mentioned groups, this was not always the case. As today, the Assyrians in the nineteenth century and earlier were fragmented in terms of language and confessional identity. It is the aim of this study to look into the context in which this fragmentation and confusion arose and examine pertinent historical sources, which inform us about the connection between ancient and modern Assyrians. This issue has been continuously debated and this study aims to contribute to this discourse.

This study examines the distant past to see the connection between Imperial Assyria and the Assyrians in the nineteenth century and the hypothesis that the Assyrians identity is purely a western construct of the nineteenth century.

There have been a number of studies, which discuss the Assyrians, continuity of their culture from Ancient times, and identity. However, this study examines a number of sources, which by and large, have not been utilised. Many travellers, missionaries, and explorers, travelled to the East between the sixteenth and nineteenth centuries and wrote about the peoples they visited. Furthermore, there are Vatican sources, which up to now have not been used in the study of the religious schisms among the Assyrian communities. These primary accounts in French, Latin, Spanish and English and certain Greek sources shed light to the problematic. Sources in Turkish, often as translated documents from Arabic and Syriac, clarified the extant information.


Dr. Racho Donef
writer, human rights activist

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1. RE: Assyrians post-Nineveh

Dec-26-2012 at 09:35 PM (UTC+3 Nineveh, Assyria)

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Assyrians post-Nineveh
identity, fragmentation, conflict, and survival (672 BC - 1920)
A study of Assyrogenous communities
by Dr. Racho Donef — Sydney, Australia. December, 2012.
http://www.atour.com/library/government/20121222a.html

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Assyria \ã-'sir-é-ä\ n (1998)   1:  an ancient empire of Ashur   2:  a democratic state in Bet-Nahren, Assyria (northern Iraq, northwestern Iran, southeastern Turkey and eastern Syria.)   3:  a democratic state that fosters the social and political rights to all of its inhabitants irrespective of their religion, race, or gender   4:  a democratic state that believes in the freedom of religion, conscience, language, education and culture in faithfulness to the principles of the United Nations Charter — Atour synonym

Ethnicity, Religion, Language
» Israeli, Jewish, Hebrew
» Assyrian, Christian, Aramaic
» Saudi Arabian, Muslim, Arabic
Assyrian \ã-'sir-é-an\ adj or n (1998)   1:  descendants of the ancient empire of Ashur   2:  the Assyrians, although representing but one single nation as the direct heirs of the ancient Assyrian Empire, are now doctrinally divided, inter sese, into five principle ecclesiastically designated religious sects with their corresponding hierarchies and distinct church governments, namely, Church of the East, Chaldean, Maronite, Syriac Orthodox and Syriac Catholic.  These formal divisions had their origin in the 5th century of the Christian Era.  No one can coherently understand the Assyrians as a whole until he can distinguish that which is religion or church from that which is nation -- a matter which is particularly difficult for the people from the western world to understand; for in the East, by force of circumstances beyond their control, religion has been made, from time immemorial, virtually into a criterion of nationality.   3:  the Assyrians have been referred to as Aramaean, Aramaye, Ashuraya, Ashureen, Ashuri, Ashuroyo, Assyrio-Chaldean, Aturaya, Chaldean, Chaldo, ChaldoAssyrian, ChaldoAssyrio, Jacobite, Kaldany, Kaldu, Kasdu, Malabar, Maronite, Maronaya, Nestorian, Nestornaye, Oromoye, Suraya, Syriac, Syrian, Syriani, Suryoye, Suryoyo and Telkeffee. — Assyrianism verb

Aramaic \ar-é-'máik\ n (1998)   1:  a Semitic language which became the lingua franca of the Middle East during the ancient Assyrian empire.   2:  has been referred to as Neo-Aramaic, Neo-Syriac, Classical Syriac, Syriac, Suryoyo, Swadaya and Turoyo.

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