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At least four hurt in Easter blast near Baghdad church

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At least four hurt in Easter blast near Baghdad church

Apr-25-2011 at 01:35 AM (UTC+3 Nineveh, Assyria)

Last edited on 04/25/2011 at 01:42 AM (UTC3 Assyria)
 
A wounded man lying on a stretcher is taken to a hospital ward in Baghdad April 24, 2011 in this still image taken from video. A roadside bomb exploded near the rear entrance of a Catholic church in Baghdad after Easter services on Sunday, wounding at least two police officers and two civilians. The bomb blew up outside Sacred Heart church in Baghdad's central Karrada district, shattering windows in nearby buildings and severely damaging a police pick-up truck at the church gate. REUTERS / Reuters TV
A wounded policeman stands near another lying on a hospital bed in Baghdad April 24, 2011 in this still image taken from video. REUTERS / Reuters TV
Medics clean the wound of an injured policeman at a hospital in Baghdad April 24, 2011 in this still image taken from video. A roadside bomb exploded nearthe rear entrance of a Catholic church in Baghdad after Easter services on Sunday, wounding at least two police officers and two civilians. The bomb blew up outside Sacred Heart church in Baghdad's central Karrada district, shattering windows in nearby buildings and severely damaging a police pick-up truck at the church gate. REUTERS / Reuters TV
Residents attend Easter mass inside the Sacred Heart Catholic church in Baghdad April 24, 2011. A roadside bomb exploded near an entrance of the Sacred Heart Catholic church in Baghdad after the mass on Sunday, wounding two police officers and two civilians, an Interior Ministry source said. REUTERS / Saad Shalash
At least four hurt in Easter blast near Baghdad church
by Hadeer Abbas, Reuters – Sunday April 24, 2011 at 9:52 AM ET

http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20110424/wl_nm/us_iraq_violence_church

BAGHDAD (Reuters) – A roadside bomb exploded near the rear entrance of a Catholic church in Baghdad after Easter services on Sunday, wounding at least two police officers and two civilians.

The bomb blew up outside Sacred Heart church in Baghdad's central Karrada district, shattering windows in nearby buildings and severely damaging a police pick-up truck at the church gate.

The explosion occurred after the church had been cleared of parishioners following services on Easter Sunday, which marks the resurrection of Christ after his crucifixion.

Two security sources said two policemen and two civilians were hurt in the bombing but a Reuters TV cameraman saw three wounded police and four injured civilians at a local hospital.

"We had just reached the scene to distribute food to the policemen there and when we arrived the bomb blew up," police officer Hassan Dalli said at the hospital where he was taken for treatment. A colleague was stretched out on a gurney nearby.

Iraqi police and soldiers were out in force on the streets on Sunday, in part because of a recent spate of assassinations of government and security officials.

The country's Christian community has been on high alert since a militant assault on a Syrian Catholic cathedral in central Baghdad last October in which 52 people died.

Iraqi forces have provided extra security to Christian churches since the assault on Our Lady of Salvation cathedral, the bloodiest against Iraq's Christian minority since the 2003 U.S.-led invasion that toppled Saddam Hussein.

Iraq's Christians once numbered about 1.5 million but are now believed to have fallen to less than 850,000 out of a population of 30 million.

Hundreds of Christian families have fled to Iraq's northern Kurdish region or to nearby countries since the October cathedral attack, the United Nations has reported.

Violence has fallen sharply in recent years but Iraq is still plagued by insurgents who carry out hundreds of bombings and other attacks each month.

An Interior Ministry source said six officers from the Interior and Defense ministries, and nine civilian government officials, have been killed in the last week by gunmen using silenced weapons.

Seven security and 12 civilian officials were wounded in the attacks.

(Reporting by Baghdad newsroom; Writing by Jim Loney; Editing by Sophie Hares)

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Assyria \ã-'sir-é-ä\ n (1998)   1:  an ancient empire of Ashur   2:  a democratic state in Bet-Nahren, Assyria (northern Iraq, northwestern Iran, southeastern Turkey and eastern Syria.)   3:  a democratic state that fosters the social and political rights to all of its inhabitants irrespective of their religion, race, or gender   4:  a democratic state that believes in the freedom of religion, conscience, language, education and culture in faithfulness to the principles of the United Nations Charter — Atour synonym

Ethnicity, Religion, Language
» Israeli, Jewish, Hebrew
» Assyrian, Christian, Aramaic
» Saudi Arabian, Muslim, Arabic
Assyrian \ã-'sir-é-an\ adj or n (1998)   1:  descendants of the ancient empire of Ashur   2:  the Assyrians, although representing but one single nation as the direct heirs of the ancient Assyrian Empire, are now doctrinally divided, inter sese, into five principle ecclesiastically designated religious sects with their corresponding hierarchies and distinct church governments, namely, Church of the East, Chaldean, Maronite, Syriac Orthodox and Syriac Catholic.  These formal divisions had their origin in the 5th century of the Christian Era.  No one can coherently understand the Assyrians as a whole until he can distinguish that which is religion or church from that which is nation -- a matter which is particularly difficult for the people from the western world to understand; for in the East, by force of circumstances beyond their control, religion has been made, from time immemorial, virtually into a criterion of nationality.   3:  the Assyrians have been referred to as Aramaean, Aramaye, Ashuraya, Ashureen, Ashuri, Ashuroyo, Assyrio-Chaldean, Aturaya, Chaldean, Chaldo, ChaldoAssyrian, ChaldoAssyrio, Jacobite, Kaldany, Kaldu, Kasdu, Malabar, Maronite, Maronaya, Nestorian, Nestornaye, Oromoye, Suraya, Syriac, Syrian, Syriani, Suryoye, Suryoyo and Telkeffee. — Assyrianism verb

Aramaic \ar-é-'máik\ n (1998)   1:  a Semitic language which became the lingua franca of the Middle East during the ancient Assyrian empire.   2:  has been referred to as Neo-Aramaic, Neo-Syriac, Classical Syriac, Syriac, Suryoyo, Swadaya and Turoyo.

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