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Iraqi Chaldean-Mexican crime ring busted in San Diego

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Iraqi Chaldean-Mexican crime ring busted in San Diego

Aug-21-2011 at 10:30 PM (UTC+3 Nineveh, Assyria)

El Cajon, Calif., Police Chief Pat Sprecco spoke today about the joint local-federal bust of an Iraqi-Mexican crime ring that allegedly trafficked drugs, guns and explosives out of a Chaldean Christian social club to a Chaldean syndicate in Detroit. Authorities arrested 60 Iraqis, many who fled their homeland after threats from al-Qaeda. Photo: Lenny Ignelzi, AP.

Iraqi Chaldean-Mexican crime ring busted in San Diego
by Michael Winter, USA TODAY. August 17, 2011.

Federal and California authorities said today they have smashed a San Diego-area crime ring in which Iraqi Christian refugees and one of Mexico's biggest cartels teamed up to traffic drugs, assault weapons and explosives through a Chaldean syndicate in Detroit.

Drug Enforcement Administration agents and local police arrested 60 Iraqis late Wednesday at a Chaldean social club in El Cajon, a working-class city east of San Diego. Many of the suspects fled their homeland amid threats from al-Qaeda and other extremists, and some are suspected of being affiliated with the Chaldean Organized Crime Syndicate, an Iraqi gang based in Detroit, home to the nation's largest Chaldean community.

The Iraqis collaborated with the Sinaloa drug cartel, the DEA said.

The San Diego Union-Tribune and Associated Press have details of the operation.

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1. 60 arrested in El Cajon Chaldean organized crime case

Aug-21-2011 at 10:43 PM (UTC+3 Nineveh, Assyria)

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The Chaldean social club, at 811 E. Main St., in El Cajon. Investigators allege the club is the hub of an Iraqi drug- and gun-trafficking organization.
Photo: Kristina Davis, Signon San Diego, August 18, 2011.
Guns seized as part of "Operation Shadowbox" in connection with the Chaldean social club in El Cajon. Photo: DEA
Cash seized as part of "Operation Shadowbox" in connection with the Chaldean social club. — Photo courtesy of DEA
60 arrested in El Cajon Chaldean organized crime caseby Kristina Davis. Signon San Diego, Reporter - Public Safety.
Originally published August 18, 2011 at 1:29 P.M., updated August 18, 2011 at 5:25 P.M.

EL CAJON — For its many regulars, the Chaldean social club in El Cajon is a place to drink tea or coffee, play Dominoes and discuss the news of the day.

But federal and local authorities say the social club, tucked in a nondescript brick strip mall behind a metal security door, is also the headquarters of an Iraqi drug- and gun-trafficking organization with ties to a Mexican drug cartel and a Detroit crime syndicate.

Sixty people associated with the social club at 811 E. Main St. have been arrested over the past 10 days in the investigation, dubbed “Operation Shadowbox,” and investigators were continuing to hunt for others implicated in the scheme.

SWAT teams served search warrants on the club late Wednesday night, seizing more than $16,000 in cash as well as evidence of illegal gambling, authorities said.

More than 100 people inside the club at the time were detained and then released.

The cornerstone of the alleged operation involves club members arranging narcotics shipments from Mexico with help from the Sinaloa drug cartel. The illicit products were then trafficked to the Chaldean Organized Crime Syndicate in Detroit, officials said.

The syndicate has operated since the early 1980s in Detroit, which has the largest concentration of Chaldeans in the nation, and has been associated with crimes including murder, arson, money laundering, fraud, human smuggling, kidnapping and armed robbery. The El Cajon area boasts the second-largest concentration of Chaldeans, with a population of more than 47,000.

Undercover agents made several drug buys over eight months, in El Cajon and around San Diego County, with the amounts getting bigger and bigger, said El Cajon Police Chief Pat Sprecco. Agents and confidential informants also purchased or were offered guns, explosives and even a hand grenade supplied from a Mexican military source.

The operation began in January, two months after Sprecco asked the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration for help to combat a spike in drug sales and violence on the city’s streets.

After a number of hand-to-hand undercover drug buys, investigators realized all roads led to the social club, Sprecco said.

The club has long been a source of complaints from the public and a suspected hub of criminal activity, officials said.

Crimes documented there have included attempted murder, drug sales, gambling, illegal liquor sales and firearms sales.

Complaints have also been plentiful over the years. Wives of men who attend the club have complained about how their family’s money is being gambled away. Neighbors have complained about drug sales and prostitution. Even club members have registered their distaste for a criminal element hanging around the club.

Investigators learned that the club managers were aware of the criminal activity and demanded a portion of the proceeds. Armed guards are often on hand during high stakes card games, Sprecco said.

There have been a number of busts and arrests at the club over the years, including a 1998 investigation into illegal gambling and a 2009 probe of gun and grenade sales.

Infiltrating the tight community of Iraqis proved to be difficult, Sprecco said. Help from the DEA, as well as from a host of state and federal agencies, helped strike at the heart of the organization this time, he said.

“We didn’t expect this level of success,” Sprecco said. “We were happily surprised with the inroads of this investigation.”

Eight defendants, including one of the alleged leaders, Nofel Noel Suleyman, 22, were arraigned in federal court in San Diego Thursday afternoon, and a ninth has also been indicted.

At least 21 defendants are being prosecuted by the District Attorney’s Office, mostly on methamphetamine-related charges.

Other agencies that participated included Immigration and Customs Enforcement, Border Patrol, Internal Revenue Service, sheriff’s and FBI bomb squads, and the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives.

“This is one case that has the ability to have a real impact on life and on the enjoyment of the quality of life,” said San Diego U.S. Attorney Laura Duffy.

The investigation has culminated in the seizure of more than 13 pounds of methamphetamine; more than 5 pounds of ecstasy, pharmaceuticals, crack cocaine, heroin and cocaine; and more than 3,500 pounds of marijuana, most of which was likely smuggled through maritime routes controlled by the Sinaloa Federation.

The cartel, headed by one of the world’s most wanted men, Joaquin “El Chapo,” Guzman Loera, has recently been allowed access to areas the Tijuana cartel once controlled.

Investigators also seized more than $630,000 in cash, three luxury cars, 34 firearms and four improvised explosive devices. The club has been shut down by the city and will undergo an abatement process.

Several club patrons said Thursday that for the most part the club hosted good Chaldeans who were just there to socialize. But they said the club also drew a bad element, with illegally stashed liquor and people doing drugs in the back alley late at night.

Saud Khairo, who has run the Kevin’s Hair Salon barbershop at the front of the strip mall for 12 years, said he hopes the raid will help his business by bringing back customers who may have been scared away by the club’s activities.

Mark Arabo, a local Chaldean and president of the Neighborhood Market Association, applauded police for making the city safer.

“This in no way, not even a half of one percent, is representational of the Chaldean community at large,” Arabo said. “Chaldeans are hardworking, great family people, Christians and give back to the community. There are so many great things Chaldeans do for the community, so this just comes as a shock.”

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2. Feds bust Iraqi-Mexican drug operation in California

Aug-21-2011 at 10:48 PM (UTC+3 Nineveh, Assyria)

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United States Attorney Laura E. Duffy talks about the indictments evolving from arrest made in the undercover operation involving Iraqi Immigrants and Mexican drug cartels at a news conference Thursday, Aug. 18, 2011 in San Diego. (AP Photo / Lenny Ignelzi)
Feds bust Iraqi-Mexican drug operation in California
by Julie Watson, Associated Press. August 18, 2011.

SAN DIEGO (AP) -- Federal officials said Thursday they've busted a drug trafficking ring involving Mexico's most powerful cartel and members of an Iraqi immigrant community in the U.S. who were caught selling illegal drugs, assault rifles, grenades and homemade explosives.

About 60 people from the Iraqi community were arrested after a six-month investigation carried out by the Drug Enforcement Administration and police in the city of El Cajon, a working-class city east of San Diego.

Many of the suspects are Iraqi Chaldeans - Christians who fled their homeland amid threats from al-Qaida and other extremists. Police say at least some of those arrested are suspected of being affiliated with the Chaldean Organized Crime Syndicate, an Iraqi gang based in Detroit.

Authorities say the suspects were working out of an Iraqi social club in El Cajon and shipping drugs supplied by Mexico's powerful Sinaloa cartel to Detroit, home to the largest Chaldean population in the United States, according to the federal indictment unsealed Thursday. El Cajon has the second largest Chaldean population.

Officials were tipped off after neighbors and even some of the club members' spouses complained for years about the establishment's criminal activity, which has included attempted murder, sales of meth and marijuana, gambling and illegal firearms sales.

Authorities seized 18 pounds of methamphetamine, narcotics, cocaine and other drugs; more than 3,500 pounds of marijuana; $630,000 in cash; four IEDs; and more than 30 guns, including assault rifles.

In April, a DEA undercover operative was shown a hand grenade by one of the Iraqis and was told additional grenades were available from a Mexican military source.

Officials believe the weapons and explosives were meant to be sold locally and there were no indications the group was supplying Mexico's most violent cartel with weapons for use in that country's drug war, which has claimed at least 35,000 lives.

William R. Sherman, acting special agent in charge in the DEA's San Diego division, said the ring was going to sell a portion of the 3,500 pounds of marijuana, believed to belong to the Sinaloa cartel led by Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzman, who has become one of the world's richest and most-wanted men since he escaped from a Mexican prison 10 years ago.

Officials say the Chaldean syndicate has historical ties to the Sinaloa cartel but they said they did not know the origins of those ties.

Over the past two decades, Mexican migrant smugglers helped many of the Chaldeans reach the United States. The descendants of the ancient inhabitants of Mesopotamia - what is now Iraq - fled their homeland to escape persecution for their Christianity. Hundreds passed through Tijuana on their way to California.

About half of the 60 arrested face federal charges and half face state charges. Some are also illegal immigrants but officials declined to say whether they will be deported.

Four indictments were unsealed Thursday charging nine people with federal narcotics and weapons trafficking charges and the unlawful possession of various firearms and explosives. One of the suspects, Nofel Noel Suleyman, was also charged with engaging in a continuing criminal enterprise, which carries a mandatory minimum sentence of 20 years in prison.

Officials said the investigation is ongoing and there could be more arrests. They declined to go into specifics about the ring's business.

The club had armed guards at high-stakes card games and its managers were aware of the criminal activity, demanding a cut of the money, according to authorities.

The establishment's troubles go back to 1998 when police seized illegal slot machines. Four years ago, authorities identified it as a hot spot for Iraqi drug deals and two years later started investigating it for selling weapons and explosives.

Sinaloa has grown bloodier and more powerful in recent years, controlling cocaine trafficking on the Mexican border with California, while expanding eastward to the corridor between Sonora and Arizona and waging a fierce battle for Chihuahua state bordering Texas. That war made the border city of Ciudad Juarez one of the world's most dangerous cities.

In October 2010, Mexico made its largest marijuana bust - 134 tons - in Tijuana and said markings on the packages linked the haul to El Chapo, showing that he was also running drugs smoothly through a city once controlled by his archrivals, the Arrellano Felix gang.

Christians make up more than a third of the 53,700 Iraqis resettled in the United States since 2007, according to State Department statistics.

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3. Chaldeans ‘Shocked, Devastated’ by Federal Raid...

Aug-21-2011 at 11:26 PM (UTC+3 Nineveh, Assyria)

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Last edited on 08/22/2011 at 01:15 AM (UTC3 Assyria)
 
Above: Sixty people associated with this Chaldean social club, located at 811 E. Main St. in El Cajon, were arrested during “Operation Shadowbox." Photo: Google Street View.

Chaldeans ‘Shocked, Devastated’ by Federal Raid in their Community
by Susan Murphy — KPBS, August 18, 2011.

Audio Report

A Chaldean group in El Cajon is at the center of a federal criminal investigation involving the trafficking of drugs, guns and explosives. The group is also tied to a Mexican drug cartel and the Chaldean Organized Crime Syndicate, a criminal group founded in the 1980s in Detroit, Michigan.

Camilia Sadik, an active member of the Chaldean community and founder of an English spelling school and neighborhood newspaper, said she's shocked and devastated by the news.

"That means we have to work harder – those of us who care, who are educated, who are human beings," she said, tearfully, "It’s really, it’s so sad. I have to keep going. I cannot stop anymore. I cannot take a break. This is how I feel.”

Sadik said young people who come to the community as refugees are easily influenced by money.

“They try hard as far as working and everything else and then they turn to selling drugs," said Sadik.

Since the U.S.-led invasion in Iraq in 2003, millions of Chaldean Iraqis have fled the country. Approximately 35,000 Chaldeans have settled in the El Cajon area -- the nation's second largest site for the refugees.

The Iraqi Christians used to be persecuted in their country during the rule of Saddam Hussein. Today they're threatened by terrorists in the Muslim-dominated nation.

Sadik hopes Chaldean leaders will see the arrests as a wake-up call and work together to provide more support and direction for the youth.

"And we need to help them out. Our community needs to tell them, 'you don’t have to be intimidated by the wealthy because you’re better, you know, you’re educated.'”

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4. Home Invasion Suspect Linked to Chaldean Drug Ring

Aug-21-2011 at 11:37 PM (UTC+3 Nineveh, Assyria)

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Last edited on 08/21/2011 at 11:39 PM (UTC3 Assyria)
 
Ranse Shaba, who is awaiting trial in a Rancho San Diego home-invasion case, was arrested this week in connection with a Chaldean drug- and gun-trafficking ring in El Cajon. Photo: John Gastaldo
Home Invasion Suspect Linked to Chaldean Drug Ring
by Kristina Davis, Reporter - Public Safety
Originally Published August 19, 2011 at 2:30 P.M., Updated August 19, 2011 at 3:23 P.M.

EL CAJON — A 19-year-old man charged in a violent home-invasion robbery in which he allegedly shot a dog was out on bail when he was arrested this week in connection with a Chaldean drug- and gun-trafficking ring in El Cajon.

Ranse Shaba, who is awaiting trial in the Rancho San Diego home-invasion case, was arrested Tuesday as he sold approximately 1,000 pills of ecstasy to a confidential informant in the parking lot of an El Cajon Vons grocery store, according to a federal complaint.

The drug transaction had been set up as a sting under “Operation Shadowbox,” a joint investigation between El Cajon police and the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration into the trafficking of narcotics, firearms and explosives that was made public Thursday. A Chaldean social club on Main Street in El Cajon has been pinpointed as the hub of the criminal enterprise, with ties to the Mexican Sinaloa drug cartel and the Detroit-based Chaldean Organized Crime Syndicate.

Shaba is a member of the social club, said El Cajon police Lt. Steve Shakowski.

Shaba’s attorney, Vikas Bajaj, said Friday that his client has been complying with all conditions of his bail by either staying at home or working in his family’s store, and that his arrest this week came as a shock to his family. The attorney said he plans to fight the drug charge.

Sixty people have been arrested thus far in connection with the operation.

The U.S. Attorney’s Office has released the names of nine defendants being charged with federal crimes in the case, and the District Attorney’s Office on Friday released the names of 21 others who are being prosecuted under state law. Police declined to release the remaining names Friday, saying doing so might jeopardize their ongoing investigation.

According to federal court records, Shaba was arrested along with three others on Tuesday during the police sting.

Co-defendant Rambo Sadik had allegedly been in contact with the DEA’s confidential informant since June, when they negotiated the purchase of a .38-caliber handgun for $450, a Glock handgun for $650 and a 9 mm submachine gun for $1,400.

Later that day, Sadik sold the informant a half-ounce of methamphetamine in the parking lot of an El Cajon Best Buy store, court records show.

The following month, Sadik is accused of giving the informant a Norinco assault rifle with the expectation that he would be paid later. He also sold him 60 OxyContin pills for $1,500.

The sale of ecstasy pills was set up for Tuesday afternoon. Sadik arrived at the Vons with a passenger, Faris Ohara, 23. Shaba arrived in a different car with Vicente Stafford. Two acted as lookouts while Shaba handed the informant the baggies of pills, the complaint states.

Agents arrived moments later and arrested the four.

Ohara was charged in a separate indictment with another man, Hajar Haji, of possessing and trafficking methamphetamine.

Shaba has been free on $250,000 bail since July 1 in connection with the separate Dec. 15 home invasion. He is charged with robbery, burglary and animal cruelty in that case.

Prosecutors said Shaba and four others pistol-whipped Robert Fritzer in his home, stole $70,000 from a safe and tied up Fritzer, his family and an employee. Shaba is also accused of shooting Fritzer’s puppy, which was barking at the masked intruders.

Two of the co-defendants in the robbery, Steve Warda Goria and David Gates, are among the 10 defendants indicted in yet another case — the alleged sports bribery scandal at the University of San Diego.

Gates and another man have pleaded guilty in the home invasion, and Goria, a Chaldean, is awaiting trial on both cases.

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5. Names of Property Owners, Defendants Emerge...

Sep-07-2011 at 01:24 AM (UTC+3 Nineveh, Assyria)

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Home owned by the Salim and Wadia Talia Living Trust, which also owned the building housing the Chaldean Social Club
Names of Property Owners, Defendants Emerge in Chaldean Crime Ring Case
by Miriam Raftery. East County Magazine, August 19, 2011.

(El Cajon) – The property at 811 East Main Street in El Cajon which housed the Chaldean Social Club is owned by the Salim and Wadia Talia living trust, ECM research has revealed. The Club has been described as a "hub" of criminal activities centered around an Iraqi crime ring, according to law enforcement.

The building housed other businesses and it is unclear whether owners knew of the alleged criminal activities that resulted in 60 arrests ranging from drug trafficking to illegal weapons sales and gambling linked to the Chaldean Social Club. The Club has a history of other law enforcement crackdowns for illicit activities ranging from illegal gambling to drugs.

According to the San Diego County Recorder’s office, the same trust also owns a posh home at 6198 Chrismark Avenue in San Diego. The 5-bedroom residence, which measures 3747 square feet, has an estimated value of $832,700, according to the real estate site Zillow.

Names of many, though not all, defendants in the Chaldean crime ring are now being made public. The crime ring is linked to a Mexican drug cartel as well as a Chaldean organized crime ring in Detroit, Michigan, according to law enforcement sources.

According to Steve Walker, communications director for San Diego District Attorney Bonnie Dumanis, the following 21 defendants in the “Operation Shadow Box” case will be prosecuted by Dumanis’ office:

Michael Acker, Robert Adams, Eddie Avila, Francisco Barba-Cantu, Hanna Sarmad, Phillip Heredia, Audrey Hobby, Jarquin Semein, Tyler Kellinger, Brittany Martin, Celina Martinez, Adriana Montez, Robert Perry (arraignment set for August 22), Edward Ranson, Rhonson Ramos, Lisa Schlegel, Angelica Silva, Steven Tausch, Herman Young, Bradley Vosika, and Agustin Villa-Torres.

Thirty suspects have been turned over to federal authorities for prosecution. Today, U.S. Attorney Laura E. Duffy announced the unsealing of four indictments charging nine individuals with violations of federal narcotics and weapons trafficking statutes and the unlawful possession of various firearms and explosives.

One of the nine indicted defendants, Nofel Noel Suleyman, was also charged with engaging in a continuing criminal enterprise, which carries a mandatory-minimum penalty of twenty years in prison.

In addition to the indictments, five defendants were previously charged in a complaint with conspiring to possess nearly 1,000 pounds of marijuana as part of this joint investigation.

According to court documents, the majority of defendants face drug conspiracy and distribution charges, as well as the unlawful sale of firearms.

Defendant Suleyman is also charged with the unlawful possession of a destructive device, specifically a pipe bomb containing nails and designed for use as a weapon. The charges carry five- and ten-year mandatory-minimum terms of imprisonment for the drug distribution and conspiracy counts and, as indicated above, a twenty-year mandatory-minimum for the engaging in a continuing criminal enterprise charge.

The indictments are the culmination of a six-month investigation into narcotics and weapons trafficking in El Cajon and surrounding areas. The investigation utilized the joint resources of the Drug Enforcement Administration and the El Cajon Police Department, as well as other federal and state law enforcement agencies.
U.S. Attorney Duffy credited the joint efforts of federal and state law enforcement in achieving the goals of the investigation and having a positive impact in the community. U.S. Attorney Duffy said, “This operation highlights the excellent work by agents on both the state and federal levels in combating violence and drug trafficking in our neighborhoods. Our law enforcement community speaks with one voice in our commitment to investigate and prosecute dangerous offenders, throughout San Diego.”

The nine defendants facing federal charges are:

DEFENDANTS Case Number: 11cr3590-BEN
Nofel Noel Suleyman Age: 22 El Cajon, CA
Karar Alekabi Age: 19 El Cajon, CA
Alen Walid Jalu Age: 22 El Cajon, CA
Christopher Ball Age: 21 El Cajon, CA
Gordon Ralph Waits Age: 24 El Cajon, CA
DEFENDANTS Case Number: 11cr3585-BEN
Akil Al-Saedy Age: 26 El Cajon, CA
DEFENDANTS Case Number: 11cr3589-JLS
Faris Oraha Age: 23 El Cajon, CA
Hajar Haji
DEFENDANTS Case Number: 11cr3586-L
Jose Valerio-Vasquez Age: 36 El Cajon, CA

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6. Scene of the crime 12: The Chaldean mafia in Detroit

Sep-29-2011 at 07:44 AM (UTC+3 Nineveh, Assyria)

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Crime historian Scott M. Burnstein (right) and Oakland Press reporter Dave Phillips.

Scene of the crime 12: The Chaldean mafia in Detroit


by Jacquelyn Gutc, Scott M. Burnstein and Dave Phillips. Monday, September 26, 2011. (video)

Crime historian Scott M. Burnstein and Oakland Press reporter Dave Phillips discuss the Chaldean mob in the Detroit area, from its rise in the 1970s to a major drug bust in 1990 and the aftermath.


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7. Office of the U.S. States Attorney, Southern District of California

Oct-06-2011 at 01:49 AM (UTC+3 Nineveh, Assyria)

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NEWS RELEASE
OFFICE OF THE UNITED STATES ATTORNEY
SOUTHERN DISTRICT OF CALIFORNIA
San Diego, California
United States Attorney
Laura E. Duffy

For Further Information, Contact:
Assistant U.S. Attorney Hamilton Arendsen (619) 557-5101
Assistant U.S. Attorney David Fox (619) 557-7005

For Immediate Release

NEWS RELEASE SUMMARY - August 18, 2011

United States Attorney Laura E. Duffy announced today the unsealing of four indictments charging nine individuals with violations of federal narcotics and weapons trafficking statutes and the unlawful possession of various firearms and explosives. One of the nine indicted defendants, Nofel Noel Suleyman, was also charged with engaging in a continuing criminal enterprise, which carries a mandatory-minimum penalty of twenty years in prison. In addition to the indictments, five defendants were previously charged in a complaint with conspiring to possess nearly 1,000 pounds of marijuana as part of this joint investigation.

According to court documents, the majority of defendants face drug conspiracy and distribution charges, as well as the unlawful sale of firearms. Defendant Suleyman is also charged with the unlawful possession of a destructive device, specifically a pipe bomb containing nails and designed for use as a weapon. The charges carry five- and ten-year mandatory-minimum terms of imprisonment for the drug distribution and conspiracy counts and, as indicated above, a twenty-year mandatory-minimum for the engaging in a continuing criminal enterprise charge.

The indictments are the culmination of a six-month investigation into narcotics and weapons trafficking in El Cajon and surrounding areas. The investigation utilized the joint resources of the Drug Enforcement Administration and the El Cajon Police Department, as well as other federal and state law enforcement agencies. A number of defendants were also arrested on state charges and will be prosecuted by the San Diego District Attorney’s Office.

U.S. Attorney Duffy credited the joint efforts of federal and state law enforcement in achieving the goals of the investigation and having a positive impact in the community. U.S. Attorney Duffy said, “This operation highlights the excellent work by agents on both the state and federal levels in combating violence and drug trafficking in our neighborhoods. Our law enforcement community speaks with one voice in our commitment to investigate and prosecute dangerous offenders, throughout San Diego.”

Case Number: 11cr3590-BEN
Defendants:
Nofel Noel Suleyman
Karar Alekabi
Alen Walid Jalu
Christopher Ball
Gordon Ralph Waits

Case Number: 11cr3585-BEN
Defendants:
Akil Al-Saedy

Case Number: 11cr3589-JLS
Defendants:
Faris Oraha
Hajar Haji

Case Number: 11cr3586-L
Defendants:
Jose Valerio-Vasquez

SUMMARY OF CHARGES

  • Engaging in a Continuing Criminal Enterprise – Title 21, United States Code, Sections 848(a) Maximum penalty: Life imprisonment and $2,000,000 fine
  • Conspiracy to Distribute Controlled Substances – Title 21, United States Code, Sections 841(a)(1) and 846 Maximum penalty: Life imprisonment and $4,000,000 fine
  • Distribution of Controlled Substances – Title 21, United States Code, Section 841(a)(1) Maximum penalty: Life imprisonment and $4,000,000 fine
  • Felon in Possession of a Firearm – Title 18, United States Code, Sections 922(g) and 924(a)(2) Maximum penalty: 10 years’ imprisonment and $250,000 fine
  • Unlawful Possession of Firearm/Destructive Device – Title 26, United States Code, Section 5861(d) Maximum penalty: 10 years’ imprisonment and $10,000 fine
  • Criminal Forfeiture – Title 21, United States Code, Section 853 Maximum penalty: Forfeiture of proceeds

INVESTIGATING AGENCIES

  • Drug Enforcement Administration - Mobile Enforcement Team
  • United States Border Patrol
  • El Cajon Police Department

An indictment itself is not evidence that the defendants committed the crimes charged. The defendants are presumed innocent until the Government meets its burden in court of proving guilt beyond a reasonable doubt.

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Assyrian \ã-'sir-é-an\ adj or n (1998)   1:  descendants of the ancient empire of Ashur   2:  the Assyrians, although representing but one single nation as the direct heirs of the ancient Assyrian Empire, are now doctrinally divided, inter sese, into five principle ecclesiastically designated religious sects with their corresponding hierarchies and distinct church governments, namely, Church of the East, Chaldean, Maronite, Syriac Orthodox and Syriac Catholic.  These formal divisions had their origin in the 5th century of the Christian Era.  No one can coherently understand the Assyrians as a whole until he can distinguish that which is religion or church from that which is nation -- a matter which is particularly difficult for the people from the western world to understand; for in the East, by force of circumstances beyond their control, religion has been made, from time immemorial, virtually into a criterion of nationality.   3:  the Assyrians have been referred to as Aramaean, Aramaye, Ashuraya, Ashureen, Ashuri, Ashuroyo, Assyrio-Chaldean, Aturaya, Chaldean, Chaldo, ChaldoAssyrian, ChaldoAssyrio, Jacobite, Kaldany, Kaldu, Kasdu, Malabar, Maronite, Maronaya, Nestorian, Nestornaye, Oromoye, Suraya, Syriac, Syrian, Syriani, Suryoye, Suryoyo and Telkeffee. — Assyrianism verb

Aramaic \ar-é-'máik\ n (1998)   1:  a Semitic language which became the lingua franca of the Middle East during the ancient Assyrian empire.   2:  has been referred to as Neo-Aramaic, Neo-Syriac, Classical Syriac, Syriac, Suryoyo, Swadaya and Turoyo.

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