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Projects worth $24 billion licensed in Iraq’s Kurdish nort.....

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Projects worth $24 billion licensed in Iraq’s Kurdish north

Feb-03-2013 at 11:57 AM (UTC+3 Nineveh, Assyria)

Projects worth $24 billion licensed in Iraq’s Kurdish north
by Fareed Hussein. Azzaman, January 31, 2013.

“The Investment Commission in the Kurdish region has licensed 517 project worth $24.3 billion, new statistics by the commission reveal.”

The Investment Commission in the Kurdish region has licensed 517 project worth $24.3 billion, new statistics by the commission reveal.

The statistics issued show a surge in private applications to start new projects in the autonomous region comprising the provinces of Dahouk, Arbil and Sulaimaniya.

The commission said most of the projects would be implemented by local firms. However, firms mainly from Lebanon, Turkey and Egypt will be taking part.

Private entrepreneurs are starting new businesses and projects in Iraq’s Kurdish north, benefiting from its relative quiet in comparison with the rest of the country.

“The Kurds also have their own investment law which allows foreigners to start and own a business without having to rely on local partners.”
The Kurds also have their own investment law which allows foreigners to start and own a business without having to rely on local partners.

But most of the flurry of construction in Iraqi Kurdistan is related to property and more than half of the investments will be spent on housing.

The region lacks an industrial or agricultural base and relies almost solely on imports for industrial goods and agriculture produce.

Only 15% of the commission’s investment is directed to industrial start-ups.

Entrepreneurs avoid building industries and agricultural projects because of the unrestricted flow of cheap goods and food stuffs from neighboring states and countries in Southeast Asia mainly china.

Labor is expensive in Iraqi Kurdistan and many Kurds now shun menial jobs, which are now filled by expatriates from Bangladesh, Pakistan and India.

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1. Iraq warns Kurds over oil exports to Turkey

Feb-03-2013 at 12:05 PM (UTC+3 Nineveh, Assyria)

In reply to message #0
 

“The Kurdish region, comprising the three northern provinces of Dahouk, Arbil and Sulaimaniya, is embroiled in differences with the central government in Baghdad.

The sides do not see many issues eye-to-eye including the fate of the so-called disputed territories among them the oil-rich city of Kirkuk.”

Iraq warns Kurds over oil exports to Turkey
by Shaymaa Adel. Azzaman, January 28, 2013.

Iraq has issued a stern warning to Kurds over their attempts to export large quantities of crude oil to Turkey.

“This is a red line,” warned Iraqi Oil Minister Abdulkareem al-Aibi.

The warning came as the minister was briefing the local press on the surge in the country’s oil output and export capabilities.

The Kurdish region, comprising the three northern provinces of Dahouk, Arbil and Sulaimaniya, is embroiled in differences with the central government in Baghdad.

The sides do not see many issues eye-to-eye including the fate of the so-called disputed territories among them the oil-rich city of Kirkuk.

Oil is the bone of contention and the Kurds have angered the central government by proceeding ahead with the development of oil fields and contracts with foreign firms without Baghdad’s approval.

But the latest row over oil exports seems to have deepened following reports that the Kurds were exporting oil to Turkey and in large quantities.

“The Kurds are under obligation to ferry all the oil they produce to the national export systems,” said the minister. “But unfortunately this is not the case.”

He said: “Our oil differences are exacerbating.”

The Kurds say they can produce up to 200,000 barrels a day but the dispute over how to export the volume and who will collect the royalties have not made it possible to add the volume to Iraq’s surging oil exports.

There are no confirmed reports of the volume of crude oil the Kurds are shipping to Turkey, but the minister said the government would not tolerate any action by the Kurds to export their oil to neighboring states.

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Assyria \ã-'sir-é-ä\ n (1998)   1:  an ancient empire of Ashur   2:  a democratic state in Bet-Nahren, Assyria (northern Iraq, northwestern Iran, southeastern Turkey and eastern Syria.)   3:  a democratic state that fosters the social and political rights to all of its inhabitants irrespective of their religion, race, or gender   4:  a democratic state that believes in the freedom of religion, conscience, language, education and culture in faithfulness to the principles of the United Nations Charter — Atour synonym

Ethnicity, Religion, Language
» Israeli, Jewish, Hebrew
» Assyrian, Christian, Aramaic
» Saudi Arabian, Muslim, Arabic
Assyrian \ã-'sir-é-an\ adj or n (1998)   1:  descendants of the ancient empire of Ashur   2:  the Assyrians, although representing but one single nation as the direct heirs of the ancient Assyrian Empire, are now doctrinally divided, inter sese, into five principle ecclesiastically designated religious sects with their corresponding hierarchies and distinct church governments, namely, Church of the East, Chaldean, Maronite, Syriac Orthodox and Syriac Catholic.  These formal divisions had their origin in the 5th century of the Christian Era.  No one can coherently understand the Assyrians as a whole until he can distinguish that which is religion or church from that which is nation -- a matter which is particularly difficult for the people from the western world to understand; for in the East, by force of circumstances beyond their control, religion has been made, from time immemorial, virtually into a criterion of nationality.   3:  the Assyrians have been referred to as Aramaean, Aramaye, Ashuraya, Ashureen, Ashuri, Ashuroyo, Assyrio-Chaldean, Aturaya, Chaldean, Chaldo, ChaldoAssyrian, ChaldoAssyrio, Jacobite, Kaldany, Kaldu, Kasdu, Malabar, Maronite, Maronaya, Nestorian, Nestornaye, Oromoye, Suraya, Syriac, Syrian, Syriani, Suryoye, Suryoyo and Telkeffee. — Assyrianism verb

Aramaic \ar-é-'máik\ n (1998)   1:  a Semitic language which became the lingua franca of the Middle East during the ancient Assyrian empire.   2:  has been referred to as Neo-Aramaic, Neo-Syriac, Classical Syriac, Syriac, Suryoyo, Swadaya and Turoyo.

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