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Aramaic Lexicon READY.

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Paul Younanmoderator

 
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Aramaic Lexicon READY.

Jan-03-2001 at 02:13 AM (UTC+3 Nineveh, Assyria)

Shlama brethren,

It is finally here.

ENJOY!!!!!

Shlama w'Burkate,
Paul

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Andrew Gabriel Roth
 
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1. RE: Aramaic Lexicon READY.

Jan-03-2001 at 10:13 AM (UTC+3 Nineveh, Assyria)

In reply to message #0
 
In my humble opinion -- taking of course into account all relevant morphological, syntactical and philogical lines of evidence that any Semiticist would choose to employ--I offer the following sober, reasoned and scholarly conclusion on said project:

THIS ROCKS!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Congratulations Paul-- MAZEL TOV! You have just taken a huge step forward in preserving this wonderful language we all love.

You know of course what you are building here-- this will be the Aramaic version of the Perseus Project by the time those 200,000 documents and the related materials are sorted through and published.

Between your work here and Dr. Trimm's now completed "Hebraic Roots New Testament", we are standing on the brink of a scholarly revolution that I am privileged to witness.

Shlama w'burkate, w'shubkha l'Alaha!!!

Andrew Gabriel Roth

(PS-- This month I will decide whether to get my completed book on Aramaic primacy to an internet publisher or to go a more traditional route. If the former, it should be finished by this April-- so stay tuned. The book is called: "Signs of the Cross: The Search for the Historical Jesus and the Recovery of the True Origin of the New Testament".)

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Paul Younanmoderator

 
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2. RE: Aramaic Lexicon READY.

Jan-03-2001 at 10:51 PM (UTC+3 Nineveh, Assyria)

In reply to message #1
 
Shlama Akhi,

Thanks! I hope the Lexicon will help to preserve this treasure for future generations.

Slowly, but surely, this Lexicon will grow. We are eventually going to place sound files next to each pronunciation, to let the user know what the word sounds like when pronounced.

Also, another entry which will be included for every word is the number and locations of every occurance on the word in the Aramaic New Testament, to help facilitate a more thorough word-study. This will be the base of our Concordance.

Finally, the "Description" entry for each word will more closely resemble a "Dictionary" definition, so that all shades of meaning will be covered.

I am looking to grow the team here at peshitta.org, and am (unashamedly) soliciting any volunteers!

Kay (9983), Shukha (20922) l'Alaha(905), Amen(1109).

Shlama w'Burkate,
Paul

ps - I am looking forward to an autographed copy of 'Signs of the Cross.'

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John Marucci
 
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3. RE: Aramaic Lexicon READY.

Jan-04-2001 at 08:03 PM (UTC+3 Nineveh, Assyria)

In reply to message #0
 
Thank You Paul!!!

Mr. Roth is right, the on-line Aramaic lexicon marks a major step forward in Aramaic studies.

I am afraid I have to report a few minor bugs.

1. Using Netscape Communicator 4.75 on a Mac the lexicon returns multiple copies of the Aramaic search query. Sometimes over a dozen reprints of the same definition, one after another. The work around for this if you want to print out your search result is to specify printing just page one in the print dialog box. Otherwise, you could waste dozens of pages of paper on the same definition.

2. Also with Netscape Communicator 4.75 on a Mac, I have noticed that while the Estrangelo font shows up fine on screen with multiple frames, the font doesnt print out, but is replace with the default Roman font. The workaround for this is to either:

a. from the links directory frame on the main page, hold down the left mouse button with the cursor over the lexicon link and select "new window with this link" from the menu which pops up,

b. or, from the frame of the lexicon which contains your search result, position the mouse cursor in the frame and hold down the left mouse button and choose "new window with this frame" from the resulting pop-up menu.

In both cases the Estrangelo font prints fine when there is a single no frames window on screen.

This may also be the problem that Melinda reported some time ago about printing out the Interlinear pdfs if she was trying to print them from a frame in her browser. Try giving the Interlinear its own window or downloading it and running Acrobat Reader on its own.

3. I recently installed Microsoft Internet Explorer 4.5 for Mac and it won't show the Estrangela font but substitutes the Roman default. I didn't see any options in the font preferences which would change this.

Finally, I was frustrated last night when I couldn't get any results on my lexicon search until I realized I had typed the wrong final form for noon. I therefor recommend, at least for Mac users, that you type your list of Aramaic search words in a word processor where you can see them in the Estrangelo font, copy them individually to your scrapbook, and then past them into your browser window.

John Marucci

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4. RE: Aramaic Lexicon READY.

Jan-04-2001 at 09:33 PM (UTC+3 Nineveh, Assyria)

In reply to message #3
 
Akhi John,

Thanks for the encouragement.

Thanks for all the detailed instructions for our Mac users. I will try and see if it is possible to alleviate some of the problems with accessing functions in this website. I'm sure it's on my end, and not yours, there are probably some things I can do here to make these functions more platform-independent.

The returning of multiple entries - that will happen on this system since the database is structured in such a way as to display all variations on a common Lexeme. To see what I'm talking about (in a grand way ), search for the English word "brother"....every possible combination you can ever want will be displayed.

Please let me know if you have a specific word you are searching for which is returning complete duplicates....that indeed is a problem with the search script or the database, and may not be limited to your browser.

Thanks!

Shlama w'Burkate,
Paul

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John Marucci
 
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5. RE: Aramaic Lexicon READY.

Jan-06-2001 at 09:14 AM (UTC+3 Nineveh, Assyria)

In reply to message #4
 
Akha Paul,

Yes, I am getting some complete duplicate entries in the lexicon with the same word number and field entries, sporadically. Both with English and Aramaic searches. For example, tonight when I searched with the English word "servant" I got all the forms of the half a dozen or so Aramaic words and then a repeat duplicate of them.

Concerning the word "servant," I have noticed that in the salutation of the Letter of James, verse 1, out of all the words for servant in Aramaic the word hdb9 (0db9) #15040 is used which seems to be derived from the verb db9 #14973, "to do." This is interesting because doing the will of the Messiah as opposed to just talking about it is a major theme of this letter.

Do you think this is just a coincidence or does it point to the fact that Mar Jacob (James) was at least thinking in Aramaic wnen he wrote this letter?

Peace,
John Marucci

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Assyria \ã-'sir-é-ä\ n (1998)   1:  an ancient empire of Ashur   2:  a democratic state in Bet-Nahren, Assyria (northern Iraq, northwestern Iran, southeastern Turkey and eastern Syria.)   3:  a democratic state that fosters the social and political rights to all of its inhabitants irrespective of their religion, race, or gender   4:  a democratic state that believes in the freedom of religion, conscience, language, education and culture in faithfulness to the principles of the United Nations Charter — Atour synonym

Ethnicity, Religion, Language
» Israeli, Jewish, Hebrew
» Assyrian, Christian, Aramaic
» Saudi Arabian, Muslim, Arabic
Assyrian \ã-'sir-é-an\ adj or n (1998)   1:  descendants of the ancient empire of Ashur   2:  the Assyrians, although representing but one single nation as the direct heirs of the ancient Assyrian Empire, are now doctrinally divided, inter sese, into five principle ecclesiastically designated religious sects with their corresponding hierarchies and distinct church governments, namely, Church of the East, Chaldean, Maronite, Syriac Orthodox and Syriac Catholic.  These formal divisions had their origin in the 5th century of the Christian Era.  No one can coherently understand the Assyrians as a whole until he can distinguish that which is religion or church from that which is nation -- a matter which is particularly difficult for the people from the western world to understand; for in the East, by force of circumstances beyond their control, religion has been made, from time immemorial, virtually into a criterion of nationality.   3:  the Assyrians have been referred to as Aramaean, Aramaye, Ashuraya, Ashureen, Ashuri, Ashuroyo, Assyrio-Chaldean, Aturaya, Chaldean, Chaldo, ChaldoAssyrian, ChaldoAssyrio, Jacobite, Kaldany, Kaldu, Kasdu, Malabar, Maronite, Maronaya, Nestorian, Nestornaye, Oromoye, Suraya, Syriac, Syrian, Syriani, Suryoye, Suryoyo and Telkeffee. — Assyrianism verb

Aramaic \ar-é-'máik\ n (1998)   1:  a Semitic language which became the lingua franca of the Middle East during the ancient Assyrian empire.   2:  has been referred to as Neo-Aramaic, Neo-Syriac, Classical Syriac, Syriac, Suryoyo, Swadaya and Turoyo.

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