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An Example of Aramaic Poetry.

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Paul Younanmoderator

 
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An Example of Aramaic Poetry.

Mar-26-2001 at 12:39 PM (UTC+3 Nineveh, Assyria)

Shlama l'Kulkhon,

Here is an example of Aramaic poetry outside of the Peshitta, by Mar Narsai. This one happens to be structed according to an 8-stiche/8-strophe pattern. This is the type of poetry found throughout the New Testament, not the Greek style of poetry.

Mar Narsai was one of the greatest of the Nestorian (Assyrian) writers. He was born about the beginning of the 5th century. He went to Edessa where, after completing his studies in Greek and in Biblical and theological subjects, he became the rector of the Edessan school (437-459). In the controversy between the Nestorians and the Monophysites, he sided with the Nestorians who enjoyed the patronage of Ibas, bishop of Edessa. After the death of Ibas, Narsai and his Nestorians colleagues were expelled from Edessa. They went to Nisibis. With the support of Barsauma, bishop of Nisibis, Narsai founded the Nestorian school of Nisibis. He was its rector for about 50 years. He died in 502 A.D.

Mar Narsai was a copious writer, both in prose and verse. He dealt with Biblical, theological, liturgical and moral subjects. His works comprise commentaries on the Bible, explanation of the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass and Baptism, a book on the corruption of morals, a number of consolatory poems, expositions, canticles, hymns,sermons, and instructions. His style if polished, elegant, rich in elaborate similes, and occasionally decked with rhymes, either in the beginning or at the end of the verses.

Many of his works perished. No complete edition of his extant works has been made. Different works were edited by different scholars. The biggest edition is that of Dr. Mingana ("Narsai, homiliae et Carmina", 2 Vols. Mosul 1905).

An Exposition of The Mysteries

He was laid in a manger and wrapped in swaddling clothes, as Man;
and the watchers extolled Him with their praises, as God.
He offered sacrifices according to the Law, as Man;
and He received worship from the Persians, as God.
Simeon bore Him upon his arms, as Man;
and he named Him 'the Mercy' who showth mercy to all, as God.
He kept the Law completely, as Man;
and He gave His own new Law, as God.

He was baptized in Jordan by John, as Man;
and the heaven was opened in honour of His baptism, as God.
He went in to the marriage-feast of the city of Canna, as Man;
and He changed the water that it became wine, as God.
He fasted in the wilderness forty days, as Man;
and watchers descended to minister unto Him, as God.
He slept in the boat with His disciples, as Man;
and He rebuked the wind and calmed the sea, as God.

He set out and departed to a desert place, as Man;
and He multiplied the bread and satisfied thousands, as God.
He ate and drank and walked and was weary, as Man;
and He put devils to flight by the word of His mouth, as God.
He prayed and watched and gave thanks and worshipped, as Man;
and He forgave debts and pardoned sins, as God.
He asked water of the Samaritan woman, as Man;
and He revealed and declared her secrets, as God.

He sat at meat in the Pharisee's house, as Man;
and He forgave the sinful woman her sins, as God.
He went up into the mountain of Tabor with His disciples, as Man;
and He revealed His glory in their sight, as God.
He shed tears and wept over Lazarus, as Man;
and He called him that he came forth by His mighty power, as God.
He rode upon a colt and entered Jerusalem, as Man;
and the boys applauded Him with their Hosannas, as God.

He drew nigh to the fig-tree and shewed that He was hungered, as Man;
and His mighty power caused it to wither on a sudden%

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Iakov
 
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1. RE: An Example of Aramaic Poetry.

Mar-26-2001 at 02:44 PM (UTC+3 Nineveh, Assyria)

In reply to message #0
 
Akhi Paul,

This is beautiful do you have in Aramaic?

Shlama Iakov.

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2. RE: An Example of Aramaic Poetry.

Mar-26-2001 at 02:57 PM (UTC+3 Nineveh, Assyria)

In reply to message #1
 
Shlama Akhi Iakov,

A good friend of mine, Alan Aldawood, may have a copy. I will inquire about it and post it, if it is available.

This post was copied from his website, which you can find at the following URL:

http://pw1.netcom.com/~aldawood

Alan also has the best grammar of Aramaic at:

http://www.assyrianlanguage.com

Please give his site a visit and tell him I said hi!


Fk^rwbw 0ml4

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Iakov
 
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3. RE: An Example of Aramaic Poetry.

Mar-26-2001 at 03:35 PM (UTC+3 Nineveh, Assyria)

In reply to message #2
 
Akhi Paul,

Todah Raba.
Shlama,
Iakov

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4. RE: An Example of Aramaic Poetry.

Mar-26-2001 at 04:01 PM (UTC+3 Nineveh, Assyria)

In reply to message #2
 
Akhi Paul,

Thank you SO much for the links.

Shlama v'Brkate.

Did I say that correctly?

Heb Shalom v'Baruk Ata.

Iakov

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Assyria \ã-'sir-é-ä\ n (1998)   1:  an ancient empire of Ashur   2:  a democratic state in Bet-Nahren, Assyria (northern Iraq, northwestern Iran, southeastern Turkey and eastern Syria.)   3:  a democratic state that fosters the social and political rights to all of its inhabitants irrespective of their religion, race, or gender   4:  a democratic state that believes in the freedom of religion, conscience, language, education and culture in faithfulness to the principles of the United Nations Charter — Atour synonym

Ethnicity, Religion, Language
» Israeli, Jewish, Hebrew
» Assyrian, Christian, Aramaic
» Saudi Arabian, Muslim, Arabic
Assyrian \ã-'sir-é-an\ adj or n (1998)   1:  descendants of the ancient empire of Ashur   2:  the Assyrians, although representing but one single nation as the direct heirs of the ancient Assyrian Empire, are now doctrinally divided, inter sese, into five principle ecclesiastically designated religious sects with their corresponding hierarchies and distinct church governments, namely, Church of the East, Chaldean, Maronite, Syriac Orthodox and Syriac Catholic.  These formal divisions had their origin in the 5th century of the Christian Era.  No one can coherently understand the Assyrians as a whole until he can distinguish that which is religion or church from that which is nation -- a matter which is particularly difficult for the people from the western world to understand; for in the East, by force of circumstances beyond their control, religion has been made, from time immemorial, virtually into a criterion of nationality.   3:  the Assyrians have been referred to as Aramaean, Aramaye, Ashuraya, Ashureen, Ashuri, Ashuroyo, Assyrio-Chaldean, Aturaya, Chaldean, Chaldo, ChaldoAssyrian, ChaldoAssyrio, Jacobite, Kaldany, Kaldu, Kasdu, Malabar, Maronite, Maronaya, Nestorian, Nestornaye, Oromoye, Suraya, Syriac, Syrian, Syriani, Suryoye, Suryoyo and Telkeffee. — Assyrianism verb

Aramaic \ar-é-'máik\ n (1998)   1:  a Semitic language which became the lingua franca of the Middle East during the ancient Assyrian empire.   2:  has been referred to as Neo-Aramaic, Neo-Syriac, Classical Syriac, Syriac, Suryoyo, Swadaya and Turoyo.

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