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Gotta love it....

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Paul Younanmoderator

 
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Gotta love it....

Jan-28-2002 at 12:47 PM (UTC+3 Nineveh, Assyria)

2 MILLION dollars spent on yet another revision - this time to make the scriptures more politically correct - meanwhile, the language the Gospel was originally preached in continues languishing in a state of neglect and within 2 or 3 generations will probably disappear from the face of the planet.

(AP) -- The International Bible Society said Monday that America's best-selling modern Bible is about to get an update using gender-neutral wording, despite past criticism of that idea from conservatives.

The revision will be called "Today's New International Version," or TNIV. The original "New International Version," which has sold more than 150 million copies worldwide since 1978, will remain on the market.

The New Testament of the latest version goes on sale in April with the full Bible including Old Testament books expected by 2005.

Notable changes in "Today's New International Version" Bible:
In Matthew 5:9, "sons of God" has changed to "children of God."
In Romans 3:28 "a man is justified by faith" has changed to "a person is justified by faith."
In some cases "Christ" is changed to "Messiah."
References to "the Jews" are described more specifically, such as "the Jews there."
The word "pregnant" will be used in place of the archaic "with child."



Zondervan of Grand Rapids, Michigan, owned by HarperCollins, holds North American rights for both versions. To date, the Bible society and Zondervan have spent $2 million to develop the new translation but they did not disclose other financial terms.

Both versions, the work of evangelical translators, are especially popular in the conservative, Protestant heart of America's competitive Bible market.

Randy Stinson, executive director of the Council on Biblical Manhood and Womanhood, a Louisville, Kentucky, group that works to preserve gender specific language, said Monday he had not yet seen the revisions but was concerned that word meanings may have been altered.

"This is incredibly serious to evangelicals, how the Bible is translated," Stinson said. "We believe the Bible is the word of God, so changing these things deliberately is dangerous."

Criticized by some groups
The older version's gender usage became hotly disputed in 1997 when World magazine, a conservative weekly, reported that the Bible society was working on an inclusive-language revision. The society had already published such an edition with a British publisher.

Leaders of the Southern Baptist Convention, the largest U.S. Protestant denomination, criticized the language change, as did James Dobson of the influential "Focus on the Family" radio broadcast.

After meeting with critics, the Bible society said it would halt publication of Britain's inclusive edition and had "abandoned all plans for gender-related changes in future editions of the New International Version."

The Bible society, based in Colorado Springs, Colo., isn't quite abandoning its pledge because the latest version won't replace the "New International Version" -- it will just be sold alongside the older translation.

Examples of some changes from 1978 to 2002: "sons of God" to "children of God" in Matthew 5:9, and "a man is justified by faith" to "a person is justified by faith" in Romans 3:28.

Aimed at Protestants
A publicity release says "the TNIV is not merely a gender-accurate edition of the NIV," because 70 percent of the changes do not relate to gender. Also, terms referring to God and Jesus Christ have not been altered.

Like the 1978 Bible, the new version is aimed at Protestants, and will not appear in an edition with the extra biblical books recognized by Roman Catholic and Orthodox churches.

The major U.S. sales competitor for the NIV has been the venerable King James Version. But the international versions will now also have to compete with two evangelical translations that appeared last year:

- "English Standard Version" from Crossway, a slight update of the 1952 Revised Standard Version that makes modest use of gender-free terminology.

- "Holman Christian Standard Bible" from Broadman & Holman, the Southern Baptist book house, which rejects gender-neutral wording. It is currently available only in the New Testament, with the full Bible due in 2004.

All or part of the Bible is currently available in some 70 English translations.


Fk^rwbw 0ml4

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Rob
 
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1. RE: Gotta love it....

Jan-28-2002 at 02:30 PM (UTC+3 Nineveh, Assyria)

In reply to message #0
 
Rediculous...

I can read it now:

"1 Cor. 11:3 But I would have you know, that the head of every person is Christ; and the head of the person the person; and the head of Christ God. "

or,

"1 Tim. 2:12 But I suffer not a person to teach, nor to usurp authority over the person, but to be in silence."

Well, we need gender equality, right???

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judge
 
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2. LOL........

Jan-29-2002 at 00:27 AM (UTC+3 Nineveh, Assyria)

In reply to message #1
 
....You gotta laugh!

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Assyria \ã-'sir-é-ä\ n (1998)   1:  an ancient empire of Ashur   2:  a democratic state in Bet-Nahren, Assyria (northern Iraq, northwestern Iran, southeastern Turkey and eastern Syria.)   3:  a democratic state that fosters the social and political rights to all of its inhabitants irrespective of their religion, race, or gender   4:  a democratic state that believes in the freedom of religion, conscience, language, education and culture in faithfulness to the principles of the United Nations Charter — Atour synonym

Ethnicity, Religion, Language
» Israeli, Jewish, Hebrew
» Assyrian, Christian, Aramaic
» Saudi Arabian, Muslim, Arabic
Assyrian \ã-'sir-é-an\ adj or n (1998)   1:  descendants of the ancient empire of Ashur   2:  the Assyrians, although representing but one single nation as the direct heirs of the ancient Assyrian Empire, are now doctrinally divided, inter sese, into five principle ecclesiastically designated religious sects with their corresponding hierarchies and distinct church governments, namely, Church of the East, Chaldean, Maronite, Syriac Orthodox and Syriac Catholic.  These formal divisions had their origin in the 5th century of the Christian Era.  No one can coherently understand the Assyrians as a whole until he can distinguish that which is religion or church from that which is nation -- a matter which is particularly difficult for the people from the western world to understand; for in the East, by force of circumstances beyond their control, religion has been made, from time immemorial, virtually into a criterion of nationality.   3:  the Assyrians have been referred to as Aramaean, Aramaye, Ashuraya, Ashureen, Ashuri, Ashuroyo, Assyrio-Chaldean, Aturaya, Chaldean, Chaldo, ChaldoAssyrian, ChaldoAssyrio, Jacobite, Kaldany, Kaldu, Kasdu, Malabar, Maronite, Maronaya, Nestorian, Nestornaye, Oromoye, Suraya, Syriac, Syrian, Syriani, Suryoye, Suryoyo and Telkeffee. — Assyrianism verb

Aramaic \ar-é-'máik\ n (1998)   1:  a Semitic language which became the lingua franca of the Middle East during the ancient Assyrian empire.   2:  has been referred to as Neo-Aramaic, Neo-Syriac, Classical Syriac, Syriac, Suryoyo, Swadaya and Turoyo.

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