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Section 2 (a) of Grammar Completed....

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Paul Younanmoderator

 
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Section 2 (a) of Grammar Completed....

Oct-05-2000 at 10:57 PM (UTC+3 Nineveh, Assyria)

Shlama all,

Section 2a (The Emphatic Noun State) of the Grammar is completed.

As always, I would appreciate any comments/complaints/suggestions anyone may have.

Shlama w'Burkate,
Paul

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Andrew Gabriel Roth
 
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1. Aramaic Grammar

Oct-06-2000 at 09:54 AM (UTC+3 Nineveh, Assyria)

In reply to message #0
 
Dear Akhi Khabiba w'Malpana:

A rabbi once said, "If you know Hebrew, give me an hour and you will also know Armaic."

This has been the way I think most of us Hebrews have approached the language. We think in Hebrew and then make a slight turn. A lot of aspects are implied or understood.

However, this can only carry a person so far. There are most certainly peculiarities and differences between the two languages.

Up until now, the most exhaustive grammars have been in Serto (western Aramaic) with precious little on the eastern side. "Classical Aramaic" was a start, but not enough was done on the Estrangela. "Aramaic Made EZ" was much better but had a kind of meandering feel to it (by intent of the author...he wants us to browse, pick and choose).

Now there is this grammar of yours. And before I say anything know that I feel kind of like the Baptist here...I should be baptized by you. How can I endeavor to advize someone who has taught me so much? A lifetime of Hebrew study and four years learning Aramaic on my own, and you taught me more in less than a year than I had picked up during this period. You will probably say that my work before primed me for understanding you. Possibly, but there must be something said for your style of teaching.

This work, like the translation, is excellent. Your examples are clear and concise. There is no jargon, and great economy of phrases, you say much with little words. I am often guilty of the opposite tendency.

One of the problems with the earlier materials on this subject was the overwhelming heft of forms and terms to memorize. So far, everything you have said here is very clear and very easy to go through. Obviously though I need to see how the sections relate to the whole of the work before saying, "What about this?", but looking at the contents it seems you got everything.

I will however be curious to see how many irregular forms you will be able to get to. A lot of primary grammars avoid them like the plague, but it seems you are deciding to make judicuous mentioning of some of them, but relating them to the predominant forms. (i.e., your discussion on gender tendencies and not forms is done in a more complete way than I have seen in other works.

Make no mistake and remember what I said about translation and what has happened since. This puppy is getting published someday.

Shlama w'burkate
Andrew Gabriel Roth

PS-- I'm having trouble with a scholar named Jack Kilmon who keeps insisting that the Peshitta NT dialect is not that of Maran Eshoo but fourth century or later. He knows about the Peshitto, but somehow doesn't see its conneection to this. He may even think the Curetonian is in Estrangela. I have invited him repeatedly to come here and talk to you and hope he will. He is formidible. But in the meantime, can I forward some of his posts to you and gfet your response?

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2. RE: Aramaic Grammar

Oct-06-2000 at 03:00 PM (UTC+3 Nineveh, Assyria)

In reply to message #1
 
Shlama Akhi Andrew,

Thanks for your comments on the Grammar.

With regards to Mr. Kilmon, I have been a great fan of his research and writings. I would be honored to have him discuss anything with me on this board.

Scholars disagree. Without disagreement, I don't think anyone would be interested in scholarship.

He and I will disagree on many points, but that's OK. That's part of the way the world turns. I'm not out to convert anyone with the sword.

I simply feel a calling to provide this translation to the world, and to provide the Eastern viewpoint on the authenticity of the Peshitta text.

If Mr. Kilmon can prove historically/archaeologically that Maran Eshoo spoke something so different from the dialect of the Peshitta as to deserve being labeled differently, I would be interested in hearing his arguments, either from himself or through your quotes of his arguments.

I can tell you that many scholars disagree with that viewpoint, as new evidence has brought forth proof that what used to be called "Galilean Dialect" is merely a liturgical/literary language....never ACTUALLY spoken by anyone.

I would also like to know why, if the dialect of Maran was different, why the Peshitta needs no glosses to explain his words that EVEN the Greek preserved.

I'm sure he would prefer to discuss this here for himself, so I would again like to personally invite him to this forum to discuss this topic (or any other topic) in a friendly and scholarly tone.

He can surely contribute much from his learning, and I think I can contribute much from mine and from my experience with this language as a native speaker.


Shlama w'Burkate,
Paul

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Assyria \ã-'sir-é-ä\ n (1998)   1:  an ancient empire of Ashur   2:  a democratic state in Bet-Nahren, Assyria (northern Iraq, northwestern Iran, southeastern Turkey and eastern Syria.)   3:  a democratic state that fosters the social and political rights to all of its inhabitants irrespective of their religion, race, or gender   4:  a democratic state that believes in the freedom of religion, conscience, language, education and culture in faithfulness to the principles of the United Nations Charter — Atour synonym

Ethnicity, Religion, Language
» Israeli, Jewish, Hebrew
» Assyrian, Christian, Aramaic
» Saudi Arabian, Muslim, Arabic
Assyrian \ã-'sir-é-an\ adj or n (1998)   1:  descendants of the ancient empire of Ashur   2:  the Assyrians, although representing but one single nation as the direct heirs of the ancient Assyrian Empire, are now doctrinally divided, inter sese, into five principle ecclesiastically designated religious sects with their corresponding hierarchies and distinct church governments, namely, Church of the East, Chaldean, Maronite, Syriac Orthodox and Syriac Catholic.  These formal divisions had their origin in the 5th century of the Christian Era.  No one can coherently understand the Assyrians as a whole until he can distinguish that which is religion or church from that which is nation -- a matter which is particularly difficult for the people from the western world to understand; for in the East, by force of circumstances beyond their control, religion has been made, from time immemorial, virtually into a criterion of nationality.   3:  the Assyrians have been referred to as Aramaean, Aramaye, Ashuraya, Ashureen, Ashuri, Ashuroyo, Assyrio-Chaldean, Aturaya, Chaldean, Chaldo, ChaldoAssyrian, ChaldoAssyrio, Jacobite, Kaldany, Kaldu, Kasdu, Malabar, Maronite, Maronaya, Nestorian, Nestornaye, Oromoye, Suraya, Syriac, Syrian, Syriani, Suryoye, Suryoyo and Telkeffee. — Assyrianism verb

Aramaic \ar-é-'máik\ n (1998)   1:  a Semitic language which became the lingua franca of the Middle East during the ancient Assyrian empire.   2:  has been referred to as Neo-Aramaic, Neo-Syriac, Classical Syriac, Syriac, Suryoyo, Swadaya and Turoyo.

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