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How to buy the Peshitta.....

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Paul Younanmoderator

 
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How to buy the Peshitta.....

Oct-15-2000 at 09:46 PM (UTC+3 Nineveh, Assyria)

Shlama all,

I just returned from a visit with the Mar Gewargis parish of the COE in Chicago. I found in their bookstore a new shipment of hundreds of copies of the Peshitta NT.

Here is the contact info: You must call on Sundays between the hours of 11 am and Noon, and ask for either Margaret Shleemon or Dawid Auda in the "Beth Deshna" (bookstore).

Each copy is only $10, and they can arrange for shipping.

Request the "Peshitta" New Testament, which come in both blue and red hardcover editions.

These versions are written in the modern Eastern script, which is very similiar to the Estrangela, but not exact. Vowel markings are included.

Also, the 5 non-canonical books are included with an introduction at the start stating that they are not originally from the Peshitta, but they are included from other translations.

The 22 books which are originally from the Peshitta are from the Eastern (Church of the East) manuscripts.

The phone number is (773) 465-4777. Again, please ask for Margaret Shleemon or Dawid Auda, only from 11 am to Noon on Sundays.


Shlama w'Burkate,
Paul

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Savitri
 
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1. Okay, now how about. . . .

Oct-17-2000 at 07:48 AM (UTC+3 Nineveh, Assyria)

In reply to message #0
 
Dear Paul and Everyone,

Now that you've sorted the issue of where to buy the Peshitta (good work!), can we tackle one of my problem areas? Does anyone know of a good Aramaic dictionary that is commonly available out there?

I've been using the best source that I could find here in England, which is a Hebrew and Aramaic lexicon of the Old Testament--but it definitely leaves a lot to be desired when working with uniquely New Testament words.

A great part of my joy in the Aramaic NT is finding deeper levels of meaning in the words of Yeshua--simply another way of looking at His mastery with words and meaning. For instance, in Matthew 16:18, the Greek word "Ecclesian" means "Church," but it also means "community," "congregation," "gathering," etc. I would love to explore the Aramaic "Edtei" as well, but have no means to do so--short of asking for your help every time I hit a word that trips me up (although perhaps you can shed some light on this one?).

I've heard that Al Titikal bookstore in Chicago has a dictionary available, but it all-of-a-sudden occurred to me (duh!) to check with you folks too. A source that can ship to the UK would be a big help, although I do have a mail forwarder in Seattle who can post such things on to me.

Thanks for your help!

Shlama w'Burkate,

Savitri

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Paul Younanmoderator

 
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2. RE: Okay, now how about. . . .

Oct-17-2000 at 10:29 AM (UTC+3 Nineveh, Assyria)

In reply to message #1
 
Shlama Akhi Savitri,

Actually, the best "Syriac" dictionary currently available (and the one I use most extensively) is printed in England....Oxford University Press. It is quite pricey (it cost me $185 US), but it is the best one out there now until the new Aramaic dictionary being produced is done (http://cal1.cn.huc.edu/info.html)

Here is the info for the Oxford dictionary:

J. Payne Smith, A Compendious Syriac Dictionary
ISBN: 0198643071

The website for Oxford University Press is: http://www.oupcan.com/index.shtml

I hope this helps, and God bless!

Shlama w'Burkate,
Paul

>Dear Paul and Everyone,
>
>Now that you've sorted the issue
>of where to buy the
>Peshitta (good work!), can we
>tackle one of my problem
>areas? Does anyone know
>of a good Aramaic dictionary
>that is commonly available out
>there?
>
>I've been using the best source
>that I could find here
>in England, which is a
>Hebrew and Aramaic lexicon of
>the Old Testament--but it definitely
>leaves a lot to be
>desired when working with uniquely
>New Testament words.
>
>A great part of my joy
>in the Aramaic NT is
>finding deeper levels of meaning
>in the words of Yeshua--simply
>another way of looking at
>His mastery with words and
>meaning. For instance, in
>Matthew 16:18, the Greek word
>"Ecclesian" means "Church," but it
>also means "community," "congregation," "gathering,"
>etc. I would love
>to explore the Aramaic "Edtei"
>as well, but have no
>means to do so--short of
>asking for your help every
>time I hit a word
>that trips me up (although
>perhaps you can shed some
>light on this one?).
>
>I've heard that Al Titikal bookstore
>in Chicago has a dictionary
>available, but it all-of-a-sudden occurred
>to me (duh!) to check
>with you folks too.
>A source that can ship
>to the UK would be
>a big help, although I
>do have a mail forwarder
>in Seattle who can post
>such things on to me.
>
>
>Thanks for your help!
>
>Shlama w'Burkate,
>
>Savitri


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Akhi Shmuel
 
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3. RE: Okay, now how about. . . .

Oct-18-2000 at 07:44 AM (UTC+3 Nineveh, Assyria)

In reply to message #2
 
Akhi Paul/ Others:
There is a source for learning Aramaic to English from the Jewish literture of the Talmud yersusalmi, Talmud ?Babali, Midrash, Targum,Zohar, and other literture. The vocbulary might be greater than the Bible alone due to al the other Ancient literture used. It is called the Aramaic Dictionary by Marcus Jastrow. It is usually available in a new edition of one volume from two being combined for about $30, a lot less than the Oxford version , but probablly less extensive.All Rabbinc Students of the3 Talmud use it as standard reference. Shlama Rabbah, Shmuel-Elizer

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Savitri
 
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4. Unfortunately. . . .

Oct-18-2000 at 07:44 AM (UTC+3 Nineveh, Assyria)

In reply to message #2
 
Shlama, Akhi Paul,

Thanks for the information--unfortunately, I had already looked for that particular volume, and was told that it went out of print in 1997. I called Oxford customer service again today, and they confirmed that.

I do have a couple of out-of-print specialists working on locating Smith's Compendium, but have been told they don't show up too frequently. So I guess I'm still in the market for something to "make do" with in the meantime.

The new multi-volume reference you mentioned definitely looks interesting--looks like I'd better start saving for it now, though! The very best to you, and thanks again for your open-hearted assistance.

Shlama w'Burkate,

Savitri

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Savitri
 
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5. Back with good news

Oct-18-2000 at 09:28 AM (UTC+3 Nineveh, Assyria)

In reply to message #2
 
Shlama, Shmuel and Paul,

Thanks, Shmuel, for the information on Jastrow's Aramaic Dictionary--I'll check out a couple of my favorite Jewish bookstores in London next time I'm down there.

Today I decided not to be put off, so I followed a string of bookstore referrals trying to track down Smith's compendium. Finally reached a little second-hand shopowner who said, "Why yes, I think we have a copy or two in stock." Turned out to be a paperback reprint of the OUP version; this one was printed in Oregon in 1999, and the used price was 35, or about $50 U.S.

It's a different publisher and ISBN, but if you're interested I'll be happy to pass that information on to you when I receive my copy in a day or two.

Thanks again for your help!

Savitri

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Paul Younanmoderator

 
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6. RE: Back with good news

Oct-18-2000 at 07:38 PM (UTC+3 Nineveh, Assyria)

In reply to message #5
 
Shlama Akhi Savitri,

Awesome news. I did call and find a copy here with Michael Mareewa at Al Itekal Bookstore, but it was the hardcover ($$$$) edition.

I'm sure you will enjoy that dictionary. The only thing, though, is that it is in the Western (Serto) script....which is particularly difficult to read (at least for me).

Once you get used to it, though, it should be no problem....it is an excellent resource.

Oh, how I wish our research materials were as plentiful (and inexpensive) as the Greek!!


Shlama w'Burkate,
Paul

>Shlama, Shmuel and Paul,
>
>Thanks, Shmuel, for the information on
>Jastrow's Aramaic Dictionary--I'll check out
>a couple of my favorite
>Jewish bookstores in London next
>time I'm down there.
>
>Today I decided not to be
>put off, so I followed
>a string of bookstore referrals
>trying to track down Smith's
>compendium. Finally reached a
>little second-hand shopowner who said,
>"Why yes, I think we
>have a copy or two
>in stock." Turned out
>to be a paperback reprint
>of the OUP version; this
>one was printed in Oregon
>in 1999, and the used
>price was 35, or about
>$50 U.S.
>
>It's a different publisher and ISBN,
>but if you're interested I'll
>be happy to pass that
>information on to you when
>I receive my copy in
>a day or two.
>
>Thanks again for your help!
>
>Savitri


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