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Association of Assyrian Women - Shamiram - Mgalta 23 journal

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Association of Assyrian Women - Shamiram - Mgalta 23 journal

Jul-14-2015 at 05:35 AM (UTC+3 Nineveh, Assyria)

Association of Assyrian Women
Shamiram - Mgalta 23 journal
Dear readers and friends,

Please find attached the latest issue (no. 32) of Shamiram – the journal of the Association of Assyrian Women, produced quarterly in I.R. Iran, by our association - an independent NGO concerned with writing about Assyrian heritage as well as current affairs. Our humble journal covers history, language, ancient and modern socio-economic and religious affairs as well as ancient Mesopotamian languages rituals and myths. A particular focus of the journal is the richness of our culture, language, embedded, transparent and enduring in Christianity and before, for example Akadian and Sumerian, but we also utilise examples of our ancestors to make inter-connections with modern ailments with our own alternative natural healing recipes , etc. Similarly, as working women/mothers we necessarily focus on issues to do with child development, violence against women and children, and peace and harmony in the family, and ultimately in society.

Some of you (especially some members of the younger generation of Ealing-based Assyrians, whom I met for the first time in all the meetings and protests we organised against the Islamic Sate terror against our people (and others in the MENA region) may be receiving our journal for the first time, so just for your information we cover (in two languages so far: Assyrian and Farsi but hopefully increasingly in English also, as well as the so called “global” dialects) a whole host of areas of both specialist and non-specialist themes. My own role in the journal has been interviewing specialists, for example, Professor Geoffery Khan of Cambridge University, our beloved artist Sami Yagoub and Mardean Issac (my son when he was at Oxford reading Syriac studies, which was very kindly voluntarily translated by Dr. Madeleine Davies from English into Assyrian and printed) and Madeleine herself for her remarkable role as an educator of our precious language.

“Similarly, as working women/mothers we necessarily focus on issues to do with child development, violence against women and children, and peace and harmony in the family, and ultimately in society.”
My other main role and writings in the journal deal with true migration stories under the theme of “Azoukh Bakhoukh, Lazoukh Bakhoukh” (We cry if we go, We cry if we stay) as an Economist but also as a specialist in Globalisation and Migration, covering different types of migration and the complex multiplicity of consequences for both home and host countries. I have historically utilised in my teachings worldwide, including in the UK, the same themes in different languages, with our language, Assyrian, being the constant one. See, for example, the first true story of this theme under (Helen Sakho/migration stories) which is a true narrative of a class I taught in Marrakech two years ago, on Globalisation, Power and Language in English, and the second one (in Farsi) from Shamiram (originally published in the journal in 2013 – pp54-68).

With apologies for this unusually long introduction, I wish to finally add that I will be posting a poem “Tkhomneta”, dedicated to my tribe, Tkhomnaye, who are 100 years on leaving Hakkayari and Hassaka for refuge from terror. They are distraught, homeless, hungry, and without news of those who may have died staying, running or on their way to somewhere, and crucially, not knowing if and when they can go back again, just like I saw my grandfather’s generation struggle, before they were given official permission to stay in Iran permanently all those years ago.

Helen Sakho
Co-editor

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1. Association of Assyrian Women - Shamiram - journal (PDF previous issues)

Jul-22-2015 at 09:18 AM (UTC+3 Nineveh, Assyria)

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Association of Assyrian Women - Shamiram - journal (PDF previous issues)
http://www.atour.com/education/20150722a.html

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Assyria \ã-'sir-é-ä\ n (1998)   1:  an ancient empire of Ashur   2:  a democratic state in Bet-Nahren, Assyria (northern Iraq, northwestern Iran, southeastern Turkey and eastern Syria.)   3:  a democratic state that fosters the social and political rights to all of its inhabitants irrespective of their religion, race, or gender   4:  a democratic state that believes in the freedom of religion, conscience, language, education and culture in faithfulness to the principles of the United Nations Charter — Atour synonym

Ethnicity, Religion, Language
» Israeli, Jewish, Hebrew
» Assyrian, Christian, Aramaic
» Saudi Arabian, Muslim, Arabic
Assyrian \ã-'sir-é-an\ adj or n (1998)   1:  descendants of the ancient empire of Ashur   2:  the Assyrians, although representing but one single nation as the direct heirs of the ancient Assyrian Empire, are now doctrinally divided, inter sese, into five principle ecclesiastically designated religious sects with their corresponding hierarchies and distinct church governments, namely, Church of the East, Chaldean, Maronite, Syriac Orthodox and Syriac Catholic.  These formal divisions had their origin in the 5th century of the Christian Era.  No one can coherently understand the Assyrians as a whole until he can distinguish that which is religion or church from that which is nation -- a matter which is particularly difficult for the people from the western world to understand; for in the East, by force of circumstances beyond their control, religion has been made, from time immemorial, virtually into a criterion of nationality.   3:  the Assyrians have been referred to as Aramaean, Aramaye, Ashuraya, Ashureen, Ashuri, Ashuroyo, Assyrio-Chaldean, Aturaya, Chaldean, Chaldo, ChaldoAssyrian, ChaldoAssyrio, Jacobite, Kaldany, Kaldu, Kasdu, Malabar, Maronite, Maronaya, Nestorian, Nestornaye, Oromoye, Suraya, Syriac, Syrian, Syriani, Suryoye, Suryoyo and Telkeffee. — Assyrianism verb

Aramaic \ar-é-'máik\ n (1998)   1:  a Semitic language which became the lingua franca of the Middle East during the ancient Assyrian empire.   2:  has been referred to as Neo-Aramaic, Neo-Syriac, Classical Syriac, Syriac, Suryoyo, Swadaya and Turoyo.

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