Home | Government | WikiLeaks Information

WikiLeaks: 2006-05-27: 06MOSUL54: Northern Iraq: Ninewa Reaction to New Iraqi Government

by WikiLeaks. 06MOSUL54: May 27, 2006.

Posted: Sunday, February 19, 2012 at 04:38 PM UTC


Viewing cable 06MOSUL54, NORTHERN IRAQ: NINEWA REACTION TO NEW IRAQI GOVERNMENT

If you are new to these pages, please read an introduction on the structure of a cable as well as how to discuss them with others. See also the FAQs
Reference ID Created Released Classification Origin
06MOSUL54 2006-05-27 13:27 2011-08-30 01:44 CONFIDENTIAL REO
Mosul
VZCZCXRO0014
PP RUEHBC RUEHDE RUEHIHL RUEHKUK
DE RUEHMOS #0054/01 1471327
ZNY CCCCC ZZH
P 271327Z MAY 06
FM REO MOSUL
TO RUEHC/SECSTATE WASHDC PRIORITY 0489
INFO RUEKJCS/SECDEF WASHINGTON DC
RUCNRAQ/IRAQ COLLECTIVE
RHMFISS/HQ USCENTCOM MACDILL AFB FL
RHMFISS/HQ USEUCOM VAIHINGEN GE
RUEHLU/AMEMBASSY LUANDA 0079
RUEHBY/AMEMBASSY CANBERRA 0062
RUEHCV/AMEMBASSY CARACAS 0066
RUEHMOS/REO MOSUL 0508
C O N F I D E N T I A L SECTION 01 OF 02 MOSUL 000054 
 
SIPDIS 
 
SIPDIS 
 
E.O. 12958: DECL:  5/27/2016 
TAGS: PREL PINS PINT PGOV PHUM IZ MARR
SUBJECT: NORTHERN IRAQ: NINEWA REACTION TO NEW IRAQI GOVERNMENT 
 
MOSUL 00000054  001.2 OF 002 
 
 
CLASSIFIED BY: Cameron Munter, PRT Leader, Provincial 
Reconstruction Team Ninewa, State. 
REASON: 1.4 (a), (b), (d) 
 
 
 
------- 
SUMMARY 
------- 
 
1.  (C) Views from Ninewa political, tribal, and government 
officials on the new -- and permanent -- Government of Iraq vary 
according to ethnicity.  The Shiite community is overwhelmingly 
upbeat, the Kurds more pragmatic, with Sunnis feeling a bit 
disaffected and minorities somewhat despondent.  Despite such 
sentiments, all sides believe there is some hope that the new 
government will bring stability.  How effective the new GOI will 
be dealing with security, especially militias, remains 
questionable.  End Summary. 
 
---------------------------- 
MEASURED VIEWS OF THE FUTURE 
---------------------------- 
 
2.  (C) Views from Ninewa political, tribal, and government 
officials on the new -- and permanent -- Government of Iraq 
appeared measured.  Sunni politicians, especially 
representatives from Saleh al-Mutlaq's Al Hewar (National 
Dialogue) coalition, were not pleased with the shape of the new 
GOI.  Provincial spokesman Musadeq al-Chalabi anticipated the 
government would undergo many changes over the next few years 
given the enormous tasks it needed to accomplish.  He said more 
"relevant" ministry posts were not offered to Al Hewar, but that 
the coalition planned to continue engaging the new government 
constructively.  "The powerful coalitions, like the Kurds and 
Tawafoq, pressured for important ministries and marginalized 
us," said al-Chalabi.  Sunnis from Tal Afar were even more 
pessimistic.  Dr. Yashar Abdullah Mahmoud of Turkoman Front and 
Sheikh Mahmoud Ibrahim al-Qado, leader of the Khowerit tribe, 
claimed the new GOI was still comprised of "foreigners" and not 
"real Iraqis."  They said former Prime Ministers Chalabi and 
Ayad Allawi (although the latter was deemed "acceptable") had 
lived too long overseas and were out of touch with the people. 
There were "more qualified" Iraqis who were not participating in 
the process, and any reasonable success would be measured, they 
said. 
 
3.  (C) Less pessimistic, however, was Tawafoq coalition members 
from the Iraqi Islamic Party (IIP).  Dr. Adeep Chalabi said a 
little more than half of Iraqis approved of the GOI, but that 
the new government would be only moderately successful.  Chalabi 
claimed most capable Iraqis were either killed in wars or fled 
the country, and therefore there was a dearth of truly qualified 
candidates.  The key to success, according to Chalabi, was to 
allow these remaining "qualified Iraqis" to take part in 
rebuilding the country, even if they were members of the former 
regime.  Chalabi said the new GOI must ensure that Iranian 
influence, especially in southern Iraq, was marginalized and 
Iraq's borders protected. 
 
------------------------------------------ 
MAJOR PLAYERS MORE UPBEAT, BUT "REALISTIC" 
------------------------------------------ 
 
4.  (C) The Kurds in Ninewa appeared more pragmatic over the 
success of the new GOI.  National assemblyman and member of the 
Patriotic Union of Kurdistan (PUK) Abdelbari al-Zebari admitted 
there would never be 100 percent approval that the new GOI would 
do a good job.  He believed 70 to 80 percent of Iraqis would 
approve since the process involved all the major coalitions. 
Manaf Hassan of the Kurdistan Democratic Party (KDP) echoed 
Kurdish sentiment in the province when saying any majority 
should be entitled to control the most seats.  For that reason 
the Shia were "entitled" to form the new government, he said. 
Hassan admitted that without pressure from the USG and 
international community minorities would have received fewer 
ministry posts.  But the distribution of ministries was 90 
percent fair, he said.  Shia political representatives were more 
upbeat.  Aref Yousef of the Supreme Council for Islamic 
Revolution of Iraq (SCIRI) said the process of forming the new 
GOI was demanding but fruitful.  He believed Shia leaders in 
Baghdad were able to gain vast consensus on the shape of cabinet 
posts, and that minority groups and the Sunni National Dialogue 
coalition asked for posts much larger than their electoral 
share.  Yousef said that with Coalition Forces assistance the 
new GOI would bring stability to Iraq.  The biggest question was 
when security would be turned over to Iraqi Security Forces, he 
 
MOSUL 00000054  002.2 OF 002 
 
 
said. 
 
------------------------------------- 
MINORITIES DOWNBEAT: WANT LARGER ROLE 
------------------------------------- 
 
5.  (C) Minority responses towards the new government were a mix 
of frustration and despondency.  Saeed Batoosh of the Yezidi 
Movement for Progress and Reform (YMPR) said the party wanted 
the GOI to respect the rights of minorities.  Batoosh said 
although YMPR members were disappointed they did not gain a 
ministry post, most of the ministers selected were qualified and 
secular.  YMPR hoped future negotiations would eventually allow 
minorities to play a larger role in the political process, he 
said.  Dinkha Patros of Beth Nahrain Patriotic Union, a 
Chaldo/Assyrian party, seemed encouraged by new prime minister 
Nouri al-Maliki's promises to dissolve militias, calling it a 
"good indication" of a strong agenda.  But minorities and 
smaller political parties were "still marginalized," he said. 
Edmon Youkhana of the Assyrian Democratic Movement (ADM) 
concurred saying the new government overwhelmingly favored 
"sectarian powers," such as the Kurds, Shia, and Sunnis. 
Youkhana claimed all minorities -- and even some Sunnis -- were 
left out of the process.  Yousef Muharam of the Shabek 
Democratic Assembly said although SDA was a member of the Shia 
Coalition, SDA reps admitted minorities had been ignored during 
government negotiations. 
 
------- 
COMMENT 
------- 
 
6.  (C) As PUK rep al-Zebari notes, there might never be 
consensus over the shape and form of the new GOI, although it is 
an encouraging sign that all major political coalitions are 
peacefully able to negotiate a government.  Some Sunni Arab 
groups, albeit new to the process, might never be satisfied 
since losing their hold on power after the fall of the former 
regime.  But it is uncertain how much influence groups such as 
Al Hewar have over the Sunni population.  At least, as 
al-Chalabi says, Al Hewar will continue working with the new 
government.  Minorities, on the other hand, believe they are 
left out of the process.  Several, such as Youkhana from ADM, 
believe the Kurds and other larger coalitions are actively 
working to keep minorities from playing a larger role.  Whether 
such sentiments are true or, as is more likely, a bit 
embellished still does not help to address the very real problem 
of adequate minority representation in the new parliament by 
smaller parties outside the larger coalitions.  Political reps 
from Ninewa say whatever form the new government takes they all 
hope it will help bring stability and security to the country 
and the province.  This, at least, is a form of optimism. 
MUNTER

 


Government ForumGovernment Forum

WikiLeaks InformationWikiLeaks Information


Do you have any related information or suggestions? Please email them.
AIM | Atour: The State of Assyria | Terms of Service