The New York Times24 March 1918

CALL FOR CLOTHING FOR WAR SUFFERERS

More Than One Hundred Receiving Stations Are to be Opened Here Tomorrow.

The American Committee for Armenian and Syrian Relief, 1 Madison Avenue, has received from one of its representatives in the Near East a letter telling of the conditions existing in Persia. In part this letter reads:

In the whole of the Province of Adzerbaijan, the greatest and richest in all Persia, the crops were less than half an ordinary crop. The bulk of the people we are helping get nothing in the way of food but dry bread.

An old woman, a good old friend of mine since years before the war and one who has in, excellent circumstances, said to me the other day: "Sahib, the bread won't go down. I soak it in water, but, it sticks in my throat. I have sold all I have but the vineyard and no one will buy that. I have gone everywhere, but no has money to lend." These people haven't even the satisfaction of being deported by the military and fed while making munitions to be fired against their friends. They would gladly be taken prisoners and deporting - if fed.

They are hungry and dying. Just now a case came interrupting me in my writing. A Jewish woman says a Syrian (Christian) woman came to her house begging late in the evening. Being late, she was allowed to spend the night in a corner of the house and this morning was found dead. She says to me: "Will you please send someone to bury her?" Such pleas are frequent now. This morning I was stopped in the yard by an old man who said: "Sahib, there is a dead man in our yard; please send some one to take him away." There are more dead than are buried. Men and women, once in good circumstances, self-respecting and respected by others, now hungry, helpless; and friendless, crawl away out of sight; die unseen, and lie unburied. This is not fiction; l have seen them.

Even should the war end in the near future, we shall have to continue relief work in bulk over the Winter of 1918 and 1919; and in a smaller degree for some years to come. The people of all classes are impoverished, the supplies of the country are exhausted, the trade of the country has disappeared; the farming cattle have diminished alarmingly; recuperation, therefore will be long and tedious. We have already given out something over 30,000 pood of Fall wheat, (over 18,000 bushels.)

Cleveland, H. Dodge; Treasurer of the Armenian and Syrian Relief Committee, acknowledges recent gifts to the fund which total more than $300,000. The total contributed to the fund, since organization more than three years ago, now amounts to more than $9,000,000. The new contributions include subscriptions from Sunday school children in Japan, Brazil, and Egypt.

Among the donations of $140 or more are the following:

American Red Cross............................$200,000
Sunday schools................................  26,500
Mrs. S. V. Harkness ..........................   5,000
Edward S. Harkness............................   5,000
Philadelphia citizens.........................   3,000
New York City citizens........................   4,000
Minneapolis citizens..........................   1,000
Capital District Com., N.Y....................   2,000
Paterson Committee.............................  1,000
New Britain Committee..........................  1,191
Egyptian Sunday schools........................  2,000
Miss Edna E. Hughes............................    500
E1izabeth citizens.............................    500
Japanese Sunday schools........................    200
Brazil Sunday schools..........................    200


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