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The Ambassador Who Said 'Genocide' and Lost His Job

by USC Institute of Armenian Studies.

Posted: Thursday, April 21, 2016 at 09:41 PM UT


Truth Held Hostage by Ambassador John M. Evans
Truth Held Hostage: America and the Armenian Genocide. What then? What now? by John M. Evans
Truth Held Hostage
America and the Armenian Genocide.
What then? What now?
by John M. Evans

In 2005, on the 90th anniversary of the Genocide, American Ambassador John Evans said 'genocide' in a public statement and lost his job. Come hear him talk about history, politics, diplomacy and present his brand new book - TRUTH HELD HOSTAGE. This is the launch of John Evans' memoir.

April 22, 7 pm at Hilton Pasadena
FREE ADMISSION

Grab a glass of wine and listen to a chapter of history from the guy who wrote it.

About the author

John Evans, formerly U.S. Ambassador to Armenia, gained notoriety in 2005 by publicly dissenting from the stated policy of the Bush and previous Administrations on the 90-year-old issue of the Armenian Genocide. A veteran of the U.S. Foreign Service, Ambassador Evans had no Armenian ancestors or family connections, but over the course of his historical studies and diplomatic career, became convinced that a gross  injustice was being perpetrated against the Armenians through the denialist policies of the Turkish Government and the U.S. Government’s tacit acceptance of them. He decided to take a measured public stand, but then paid for his "heresy” by being dismissed from his post and forced into early retirement, although not without a fight over the issue in the U.S. Congress.

Over the course of his thirty-five-year career, Ambassador Evans  served with distinction in diplomatic posts in Tehran, Prague, Moscow, Brussels (NATO), St. Petersburg and Washington, reaching the rank of Minister-Counselor. A native of Williamsburg, Virginia, educated at Yale and Columbia, he is an avid student of Russian history who devoted a sabbatical year to investigating the decline of the Ottoman Empire, the setting in which the tragic events of 1915 occurred.

Now retired from the Foreign Service, Mr. Evans makes his home in  Washington with his wife, the former Donna Chamberlain.

For information:
USC Institute of Armenian Studies
3501 Trousdale Pkwy
Taper Hall, Room 312
Los Angeles, CA 90089 USA
213-821-3943
armenian [ a t ] usc.edu

Established in 2005, the USC Institute of Armenian Studies supports multidisciplinary scholarship to re-define, explore and study the complex issues that make up the contemporary Armenian experience – from post-Genocide to the developing Republic of Armenia to the evolving Diaspora. The Institute encourages research, publications and public service, and promotes links among the global academic and Armenian communities.


Ambassador Morgenthau's Story

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